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Some pain relievers dangerous to heart attack patients
May 9th, 2011
05:50 PM ET

Some pain relievers dangerous to heart attack patients

When heart attack survivors or those with heart disease take certain pain relievers it puts them at higher risk for heart attack or death according to a new study in Circulation, a journal of the American Heart Association. The new research says that even short-term use of  NSAIDs, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, is unsafe.

NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, naproxen, Voltaren, Celebrex and others provide relief for those who suffer from painful arthritis, lupus or other debilitating conditions. But when these patients also have heart trouble, the drugs' use is cause for concern.

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Filed under: Heart • Pain

Study: 58,000 in U.S. waking up to strokes
May 9th, 2011
05:27 PM ET

Study: 58,000 in U.S. waking up to strokes

Patients who suffer severe strokes often get a clot-busting treatment – one that must be delivered within just a few hours.

But a new study released in Neurology estimates that some 58,000 patients go to the emergency department every year in the United States after waking up with the symptoms of a stroke.

In those cases, nobody really knows when the stroke began, so doctors do not prescribe the most common treatment for ischemic strokes (those caused by clots, as opposed to a brain bleed)  – a medication called tissue plasminogen activator (tPA).

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Tri Challenge: Evidence of a healthier, happier lifestyle
May 9th, 2011
09:30 AM ET

Tri Challenge: Evidence of a healthier, happier lifestyle

“Evidence-based medicine”

This is a common term. Physicians and other health care providers use evidence-based medicine to guide the way that we treat patients. Which medications/therapies have the proof, or evidence, that they are the most effective to treat that diagnosis?

Today I found more evidence that what I have been doing for the past several months is making a difference. I had my follow-up fitness assessment with my trainers today to gauge what kind of progress I have made. The first assessment was back in January, just before the CNN Fit Nation Triathlon Challenge started. I had already made some changes in my life – eating better and working out more regularly – and had lost about 20 pounds. I was happy with the progress that I had made, but knew that there was a long way to go.

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Inside women's sexual brains, preferences and porn
May 9th, 2011
08:01 AM ET

Inside women's sexual brains, preferences and porn

Men everywhere have probably wondered for thousands of years: What turns women on?

In the age of the Internet, it's possible to find out. And with countless genres of images, videos and erotic stories available online, women are both able and empowered to access arousing material, and figure out for themselves what they like. Some are watching porn, as our sex columnist Ian Kerner pointed out in a recent column.

But what women are viewing and reading is usually not what men are searching for, according to a new book on the subject. In "A Billion Wicked Thoughts," released Thursday, neuroscientists Ogi Ogas and Sai Gaddam combine web searches, personal search histories, websites, and classified ads with insights from brain science to discover precisely how different women are from men.

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May 9th, 2011
07:44 AM ET

When should my baby see a dentist?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Mondays, it's pediatrician Dr. Jennifer Shu.

Asked by Samantha from San Diego, California

Q: My baby just turned 1 year old and has eight teeth. When does he need to start seeing a dentist?
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Vacation season: Airplane rides and DVT
May 9th, 2011
05:00 AM ET

Vacation season: Airplane rides and DVT

As the school year winds down and the weather improves in most parts of the country, families may be planning their vacations and doctors want travelers to remember that long trips can raise the risk of getting dangerous blood clots.

Sitting for a long time in a car or on a plane can slow down blood flow, which can lead to a very serious condition called deep vein thrombosis or DVT – caused by blood clots that form in a person's lower leg or thigh and break off.

"DVT is very dangerous and can do severe damage to a person's body and if the clot breaks off and travels to the lung, it can be fatal," says Dr. Sandra Schneider, president of the American College of Emergency Physicians in a press release. A clot in the lung creates a condition known as a pulmonary embolism.
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May 9th, 2011
12:01 AM ET

More cancer among gay men, California study finds

Gay men in California are nearly twice as likely to report a cancer diagnosis as straight men in the state, according to new research published online Monday in the medical journal Cancer.

Few cancer studies investigate how sexual orientation might affect cancer risk and survivorship, often because study participants are not asked about their sexual orientation. In Monday's study, researchers used a large health survey conducted by the state of California - in which respondents were asked about their orientation - to examine the impact cancer may be having on gays and lesbians in the state.

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CT scans not always necessary in kids' head trauma
May 9th, 2011
12:01 AM ET

CT scans not always necessary in kids' head trauma

When children are taken to the hospital with bumps to the head, many receive brain CT scans to determine the damage. Yet, according to statistics, in most cases, traumatic brain injury does not occur and the child is fine. Now new research finds that observing a child with head injuries for a certain period of time can help physicians determine whether the child has a serious problem without using CT scans. This not only cuts down on the cost of the visit, but also eliminates unnecessary exposure to unwanted radiation.

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Vitamin D in pregnancy may protect infants from virus
May 9th, 2011
12:01 AM ET

Vitamin D in pregnancy may protect infants from virus

Infants who are deficient in vitamin D at birth are at six times higher risk for getting RSV, or respiratory syncytial virus during their first year of life compared with infants with very high levels of vitamin D, says a new study in the journal Pediatrics.

"Vitamin D intake during pregnancy most likely prevents a highly frequent, severe disease during infancy," said Dr. Louis Bont, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Wilhelmina Children's Hospital in Utrecht, Netherlands. FULL POST


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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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