home
RSS
What the Yuck: Am I having a panic attack?
May 6th, 2011
05:41 PM ET

What the Yuck: Am I having a panic attack?

Too embarrassed to ask your doctor about sex, body quirks, or the latest celeb health fad? In a regular feature and a new book, "What the Yuck?!," Health magazine medical editor Dr. Roshini Raj tackles your most personal and provocative questions. Send 'em to Dr. Raj at whattheyuck@health.com.

Q: My heart sometimes feels like it's racing in my chest - am I having a panic attack?

Anxiety can definitely cause palpitations (feeling like your heart is pounding or jumping in your chest). If you are about to do something nerve-wracking like give a speech, you may feel your heart beating a little faster, which is a normal response to stress hormones.
FULL POST


5 best and worst places for moms
May 6th, 2011
04:26 PM ET

5 best and worst places for moms

The best country to be a mom is Norway, with its generous maternity leave, lowest infant mortality rate and high preschool attendance rates.

The worst place is Afghanistan and several sub-Saharan African countries, where female life expectancy is low and women endure multiple high-risk pregnancies, according to Save the Children’s annual rankings  released before Mother’s Day. The photo above shows a baby born in the maternity ward of a hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan.

The health rankings were based on lifetime risk of maternal death, percentage of women using modern contraception, the presence of a skilled attendant at birth, and female life expectancy.  The Mothers’ Index compared the well-being of mothers and children in 164 countries. FULL POST


May 6th, 2011
03:56 PM ET

Tri Challenge: Gaining buns – and nerves – of steel
May 6th, 2011
01:24 PM ET

Tri Challenge: Gaining buns – and nerves – of steel

I think that part of our 6-pack training experience in Kona was intended to jolt us into the reality that the NYC Triathlon is now just twelve short weeks away and we have much training left to do. My Hawaii experience brought changes both physical and mental.

Physically, I became a little more fit, which is actually starting to show. Sure, it feels great to accomplish my workouts and have more energy these days, but when people start noticing that I’ve lost weight, that is an extra bonus! My hope is that I can inspire others to get off the couch like I have done, and get out and live life to the fullest. I have also noticed a humorous twist: Occasionally someone doesn’t even recognize me! (Stay tuned…I may do some mischief with that one soon…)

FULL POST


May 6th, 2011
11:48 AM ET

Gupta: What the future may hold for Giffords

Don’t miss “Dr. Sanjay Gupta Reports: Saving Gabby Giffords,” on Sunday, May 8 at 7 p.m. ET. The documentary reveals exclusive details  of the extraordinary efforts by paramedics and doctors credited with  saving the life of the congresswoman. You can also join Dr. Gupta for a LIVE chat on Twitter during the program.

I asked the Tucson doctors who cared for Rep. Gabby Giffords a question many people have asked me: Would she be able to return to work on Capitol Hill?  Trauma surgeon, Dr.  Randy Friese did not hesitate in his response. “I voted for her before, and I told her that I plan on voting for her again,” he said.

Trauma chief Dr. Peter Rhee paused a bit before answering. “I think she will. I think that everybody wants her to. There's enough enthusiasm that that's going to probably occur. Is she going to be the same as she was before? I think she's going to have permanent changes in thoughts and memories and feelings and emotions, so we'll have to see how that pans out in the future but I think she'll be doing very well.”

The brain's amazing ability to heal

FULL POST


FDA sets kids' dosing for liquid meds
May 6th, 2011
11:47 AM ET

FDA sets kids' dosing for liquid meds

Figuring out how much liquid medication to give your baby or toddler should be a little easier, if manufacturers follow the Food and Drug Administration's final recommendations for liquid over-the-counter drugs, which were released this week. The FDA is asking manufacturers to provide clearly and consistently marked delivery devices (syringes, cups, droppers or spoons), which will provide accurate doses of the liquid medication.

These guidelines grew out of concerns over confusing and/or mismatched instructions between labels and dispensing devices can lead to children getting too much or to little medication.

"Accidental medication overdose in young children is an increasingly common, but preventable public health problem," says Dr. Karen Weiss, in a statement. Weiss is the director of the "Safe Use Initiative" in the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.

FULL POST


Where alcoholics can drink themselves to death
Marion Hagerman, 54, is a chronic alcoholic who lives at a "wet house," a state-funded residence where he's allowed to drink.
May 6th, 2011
07:38 AM ET

Where alcoholics can drink themselves to death

Learn more about the controversial "wet house" concept for dealing with chronic alcoholics this Saturday and Sunday at 7:30 a.m. ET on "Sanjay Gupta, MD."

St. Paul, Minnesota (CNN) - It's been over seven years since Marion Hagerman has spoken to anyone in his family.  As he huddles behind a parked trailer on a cold early spring day, Hagerman reflects on his life, and recalls what led him to this moment.

"This is my lifestyle," says Hagerman, 54, while sneaking a swig of what he calls "wash," or mouthwash - a cheap way of getting intoxicated. "It ain't much, but this is what I have.  It sucks. "

He says he held a steady job for 20 years, before his addiction to alcohol took over his life.  Today, Hagerman lives at St. Anthony Residence in St. Paul, Minnesota, along with about 60 other late-stage alcoholics.

St. Anthony, which receives funds from the state and is operated by Catholic Charities, is known as a "wet house" because Hagerman and the others are allowed to drink on site, with some caveats - including no mouthwash.
FULL POST


Is carbonated water safe to drink?
May 6th, 2011
07:20 AM ET

Is carbonated water safe to drink?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Friday, it's Dr. Melina Jampolis, a physician nutrition specialist.

Question asked by Vicky B. of Riverview, Michigan

I just bought a home carbonator. Is there any danger to drinking carbonated water instead of still water? Some web articles state that carbonated water does not flush toxins like still water, that it causes kidney stones because it is harder to digest and that it leaches calcium from the bones.
FULL POST


Advertisement
About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

Advertisement
Advertisement