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What the Yuck: Do I have to stop wearing heels?
April 22nd, 2011
04:41 PM ET

What the Yuck: Do I have to stop wearing heels?

Too embarrassed to ask your doctor about sex, body quirks, or the latest celeb health fad? In a regular feature and a new book, "What the Yuck?!," Health magazine medical editor Dr. Roshini Raj tackles your most personal and provocative questions. Send 'em to Dr. Raj at whattheyuck@health.com.

Q: I have developed ugly, painful bunions. Do I have to stop wearing my high heels?

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April 22nd, 2011
03:57 PM ET

TEDMED: Young brains, autism and epilepsy

If you know a teenager who seems as if he or she is a member of a different species, it's not all in your head. There are many differences in brain structure and function that distinguish teens from adults - both in good and bad ways.

Dr. Frances Jensen, neuroscientist at Children's Hospital Boston and president-elect of the American Epilepsy Society, explained at the TEDMED 2010 conference that since young people's brains are still developing, they are better at learning new skills and information. For instance, the earlier in life you start learning a language, the more of a chance you have at becoming truly fluent.

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Gupta joins triathletes in Hawaii
April 22nd, 2011
03:48 PM ET

Tri Challenge: Personal bests during mini tri

Do you remember the first time you swam in the ocean? Kas Seerla does, that's for sure. It happened here in Kona, Hawaii, two days ago. She braved the waves, the current and lots of anxiety to swim nearly a quarter of a mile. And then she did it all again yesterday during this week's capstone workout: a mini tri where the 6-pack swam for 20 minutes, biked for an hour and ran for 20 minutes.

Yesterday was hot, hot, hot, but that didn't stop anyone from completing the race. Even Kendrick was able to swim, bike and run the course - stitches and all.

Collectively, the 6-pack came here with only a few miles logged on the road bike, a few lengths in the pool, a few miles of running. But they're leaving Kona each having experienced a personal best of some sort. For Joaquin, it was swimming almost a half of mile when before he hadn't been able to swim more than two pool lengths. Stasia and Kas swam in the ocean for the first time. Scott, Kendrick and Nina collectively biked 65 miles in a day - a huge improvement from the short rides they had been doing.

As each person continues to change their life and become stronger and healthier, we'll continue to bring you their journeys. We hope you'll be inspired to start changing your life, too!


April 22nd, 2011
03:22 PM ET

Is it possible to 'top out' on cardio strength?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Friday, it's Dr. Melina Jampolis, a physician nutrition specialist.

Asked by Nick E., Menomonie, Wisconsin

I'm 23 years old and a fairly active person who has been in training as an amateur boxer for some time now, and I'm trying to improve my cardiovascular strength and stamina. I've been running outdoors quite regularly (every day to every other day), but I seem to have "topped out" my cardio strength. I was wondering if there is a more effective way to further improve on this. Is it better to run longer distances but at less intensity or vice versa? Do you have any other recommendations? FULL POST


Blood clot risk higher in newer birth control pills, study finds
April 22nd, 2011
02:12 PM ET

Blood clot risk higher in newer birth control pills, study finds

Women who are using a newer version of birth control that contains the hormone drospirenone have a higher risk of serious blood clot, according to two studies published in the online version of the British Medical Journal.

Drospirenone is found in birth control pills such as Ocella, Yasmin and Yaz.

The studies found that drospirenone has two to three times more risk of blood clots compared with birth control pills containing an older form of a progestin hormone called levonorgestrel. Dr Susan Jick, lead authors said that these findings “provide further evidence that levonorgestrel pills appear to be a safer choice” pertaining to blood clots. FULL POST


April 22nd, 2011
02:01 PM ET

FitFriday: Cheese, bacon, fried chicken - still a salad?
April 22nd, 2011
01:55 PM ET

FitFriday: Cheese, bacon, fried chicken - still a salad?

Is it really a salad if leaves of romaine lettuce are accompanied by orzo pasta, chicken, capers and the whole thing packs a 900-calorie punch?

In the mind of dieters – we fixate on the fact that it’s called a salad instead of what’s actually in it.  So we'll convince ourselves that a  "salad" - even one packed with piles of cheese or globs of dressing - is healthy.

Consumers munch on deep-fried chips, because the label says they're vegetable chips and glug sugary drinks that have just as many calories as soda, because they're called “flavored water."

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Tri Challenge: A crash, 2 stitches and still celebrating
April 22nd, 2011
01:55 PM ET

Tri Challenge: A crash, 2 stitches and still celebrating

I have had the most amazing time here in Kona. On Tuesday, I was riding my bike in the lava fields and really taking in the scenery and getting into the groove of the ride. The most difficult thing with the bike has been having control over the bike.

Unlike other bikes I have had in the past, road bikes are really responsive to the slightest movement of the handle bars. Also, our bike rides in Kona have been on the shoulder of a very busy road, which made me anxious. So as I was peddling along, I veered off the road into the gravel, and as I tried to brake it I kept going, and before I knew it, I flew off the bike over the handle bars and my chin hit a lava rock.

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Water in schools - what readers say
April 22nd, 2011
12:25 PM ET

Water in schools - what readers say

Tune into "Sanjay Gupta, M.D."7:30A.M. ET  Saturday- Sunday to learn more about water in schools.

This week’s story about the difficulties many children have with getting drinking water at school  prompted a lot of interesting comments. My interest in this story began in December after reading through the actual legislation that President Obama signed into law on that day.

Many people, especially those in politics and media, often make a big deal about the number of pages that make up federal legislation like health care reform, but what always strikes me is the opposite: How little is written to change so much.  Think about it – the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 defines nutrition policy for America’s schoolchildren, and it’s 200 pages long with only 25 lines per page. That’s much less text than the book you’d read while sitting on the beach. And the section mandating that every public school across the country provide free drinking water? It's just eight lines long.

It’s so brief in fact it’s easy to miss – but when you think about what it's saying, it's a huge deal. Why is it in there? What is it trying to accomplish? That’s what led to the earlier article, and to all of your comments. Here are just some of the reader comments that struck me, grouped into similar themes.

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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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