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Kids traveling abroad need measles vaccine
April 7th, 2011
01:42 PM ET

Kids traveling abroad need measles vaccine

Measles is rare in the United States, in fact, the ongoing transmission of the disease was declared eliminated in the U.S. in 2000, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  But a new report from the CDC suggests that measles may be on the rise in this country,  because it can be brought in by people who travel to other countries.

As of April 1, 48 people have been infected with measles in the United States.  In the first two months of 2011 alone, 13 were "imported measles cases" - which means the disease was brought in from abroad or associated with an internationally imported case. Seven of those infected were unvaccinated children between the ages of 6 and 23 months.

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April 7th, 2011
08:46 AM ET

TEDMED: 'Grace' at the end of life

"Death just wasn’t something you talked about in our family," says Alexandra Drane, co-founder of the nonprofit Engage With Grace. Her organization encourages end-of-life conversations, offering a practical guide to addressing tough issues within families. In the video above, Drane, speaking at TEDMED 2010, tells the tear-jerking story of her sister-in-law Rosaria's final days.

Drane is an entrepreneur who's had a hand in many different kinds of projects. She's also the founder and president of Eliza Corporation, a healthcare communications company.

Asking your loved ones about what they want at the end of life is a difficult prospect, but in Drane's view these conversations are essential. Large family gatherings, including Thanksgiving, can provide good opportunities. She spoke to CNN about how to approach the topic:

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Female infidelity: It's different from the guys
April 7th, 2011
08:29 AM ET

Female infidelity: It's different from the guys

Ian Kerner, a sexuality counselor and New York Times best-selling author, blogs about sex on Thursdays on The Chart. Read more from him at his website, GoodInBed.


In a committed relationship nothing hurts more, or is harder to recover from, than infidelity, and this is even truer when it’s the female partner who’s been doing the cheating.  In recent years I’ve noticed a precipitous rise in the number of men who have been betrayed by adultery, and while there’s an overall consensus among professionals that female infidelity is on the rise, the trend doesn’t garner nearly as much attention as male infidelity  That’s surprising, because female infidelity is often much more damaging to a marriage. Don’t get me wrong: Male cheating is definitely harmful. But when a woman fools around, it’s often the death knell to a couple’s relationship.

It's often said that men cheat for sex, while women cheat for love, the theory being that men can more easily compartmentalize sex and emotion, while women typically need to experience an emotional connection to a person before feeling sexual desire. Without those pesky emotions to stand in the way of a potential mistake, a guy is much more likely to get himself into trouble (especially if alcohol is involved and inhibitions are down) or to get involved with someone for whom he has no feelings.

That’s not to say that men don't cheat  because they're unhappy, in search of an emotional connection or simply bored in their relationship (a topic we’re currently analyzing at Good in Bed), but  many of the men I've encountered who have cheated on their wives often have no desire to leave their primary relationship. Many of them even characterize themselves as happily married with satisfying sex lives.

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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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