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March 25th, 2011
03:47 PM ET

This week's quiz: Babies, Liz Taylor's legacy, nuclear disaster and more!

Editor's note: A question regarding the use of sunscreen on babies has been removed. The American Academy of Pediatrics says that on babies under 6 months old, a minimal amount of sunscreen can be applied to small areas - such as the face and the back of the hands - if adequate clothing and shade are not available.

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Triathlon races and living spaces
March 25th, 2011
03:35 PM ET

Triathlon races and living spaces

Since starting my tri training earlier this year, I have noticed gradual but distinct alterations in my immediate surroundings. I have a small and tidy little house. Lately it’s more small than tidy. I have always been able to get it “company-clean” in about an hour, but in recent weeks I’ve had trouble getting that hour to coincide with the energy necessary to get the job done. And just in time for kitty-cat shedding season to begin… oh dear.

My closet and dressing area have changed. I am an organized person: My clothes go straight from dryer to hanger, and then to their place in my closet. Suddenly, however, there is this MOUNTAIN OF WORKOUT CLOTHES growing at volcano-rate over in one corner. I mean, why bother to hang them up? I’m just going to put them on again in a few hours or throw them into the bag for the pool. And spandex doesn’t wrinkle anyway, so where’s the worry?

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March 25th, 2011
12:43 PM ET

Human Factor: Hiroshima survivor uses radiation to heal

In the Human Factor, Dr. Sanjay Gupta introduces you to survivors who have overcome tremendous odds. Confronting a life obstacle – injury, illness or other hardship – they tapped their inner strength and found resilience they didn’t know they possessed. Be inspired by their successes, as we have been.

Ritsuko Komaki was just a baby when Hiroshima was destroyed. She lived less than an hour away, and the effects of that nuclear blast in August 1945 colored her life.

Like many survivors of the atomic bomb, she watched her mother, grandmother, family members and friends suffer from radiation sickness.  The death of her childhood friend, who folded about 600 origami cranes while struggling with leukemia, inspired Komaki to pursue medicine.

Komaki realized that while radiation was lethal, it could also help and treat cancers.  She is now an oncologist at the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas, and says, radiation has always been part of her life.

Dr. Sanjay Gupta has her story in today's Human Factor.


FDA approves new drug for late-stage melanoma
March 25th, 2011
12:29 PM ET

FDA approves new drug for late-stage melanoma

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first  melanoma  drug in 13 years. The new drug, ipilimumab, which will be sold under the brand name Yervoy and manufactured by Bristol-Myers Squibb, is designed to stop the cancer cells from growing by stimulating the immune system to recognize the cancer cells as something to attack.

"Late-stage melanoma is devastating, with very few treatment options for patients, none of which previously prolonged a patient's life," Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the FDA's Office of Oncology Drug Products said in a press statement."Yervoy is the first therapy approved by the FDA to clearly demonstrate that patients with metastatic melanoma live longer by taking this treatment."

"It's good solid base hit, but it's not a home run," says Tim Turnham, executive director of the Melanoma Research Foundation. "The response rates are in the low 20% rate, so three-fourths of the people who take it won't benefit from it," Turnham says. "It's pretty clear we still have a long way to go."

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What the Yuck: Can hair dye cause cancer?
March 25th, 2011
11:26 AM ET

What the Yuck: Can hair dye cause cancer?

Too embarrassed to ask your doctor about sex, body quirks, or the latest celeb health fad? In a regular feature and a new book, "What the Yuck?!," Health magazine medical editor Dr. Roshini Raj tackles your most personal and provocative questions. Send 'em to Dr. Raj at whattheyuck@health.com.

Q: I heard that dark hair dye causes cancer, and I'm worried. Does that mean I should go blonde?

No need to. Before the early 1970s, many hair dyes contained buckets of chemicals, some of which were shown to cause cancer in animals. The darker dyes contained more potential carcinogens (cancer-causing agents), so they were believed to be riskier. Since then, dye manufacturers have removed many - though not all - of these toxic chemicals.
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March 25th, 2011
08:48 AM ET

Should I give protein shakes to my 8-year-old daughter?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Friday, it's Dr. Melina Jampolis, a physician nutrition specialist.

Asked by Michelle, Kentucky

My 8-year-old daughter is about to begin the "Girls on the Run" program (a program where they train girls between third and eighth grade to run a 5K,) at her school. She would like me to make her the same protein shake after practices that I have myself after my workouts. (I make an 8-oz smoothie of skim milk, fat free vanilla yogurt and vanilla flavored natural whey protein powder. I do a combo of yoga, pilates and strength training.) I am not sure if this is something she needs or should have, nutritionally. Any advice or alternatives for her after her practices? She is convinced she needs something more than water because she does experience muscle cramps and has had shin splints before. FULL POST


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Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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