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Mouse study may offer hope for infertile men
March 24th, 2011
04:54 PM ET

Mouse study may offer hope for infertile men

After decades of failure, researchers have managed to create fertile sperm in a laboratory, raising hopes for infertile men.

“I think for everyone in the field, especially for the potential patients, it’s quite exciting,” says Martin Dym, a professor of biochemistry at Georgetown University School of Medicine.

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CDC reports lowest TB rates ever in U.S.
March 24th, 2011
03:46 PM ET

CDC reports lowest TB rates ever in U.S.

Tuberculosis cases have reached an all-time low in the United States, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released Thursday, which is also World TB Day. Last year, 11,181 people in the U.S. were reported to have TB, which means there were only 3.6 cases of TB per 100,000 people, down nearly 4% from the previous year.  The CDC says the number of TB cases in this country are at the lowest level since national reporting began in 1953.

But these TB rates aren't low enough. Back in 1989, the CDC had set a goal of eradicating TB in this country by the year 2010, which would have meant less than 1 case per million people in a given year.

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How puppy love can help your sex life
March 24th, 2011
12:20 PM ET

How puppy love can help your sex life

Ian Kerner, a sexuality counselor and New York Times best-selling author, blogs about sex on Thursdays on The Chart. Read more from him at his website, GoodInBed.

After my dog - a curmudgeonly Jack Russell terrier named Houdini - passed away in 2008, I was sure that I wasn’t going to get another one anytime soon. Not only had Houdini’s death thrown me into an awful state of prolonged grief, but so much had changed since my single days when I had had the luxury of time and freedom, as well as a powerful unmet childhood need to have a dog of my own. But now I had a wife and two young kids (not to mention an elderly cat), and my primary unmet need was for more alone-time with my wife. As much as I loved dogs, I didn’t have the room in my home - or, I thought, in my heart - for another one.

But my wife didn’t agree. Eventually she decided it was time for us to expand our family, and we found ourselves walking home from our local shelter (the awe-inspiring Animal Haven), with a pit-bull puppy named Jitterbug, who had been abandoned in a box and left for dead in the middle of winter. (That's her in the photo.)

Now, a year later, Jitterbug has brought inestimable joy to our lives: Not only is she a constant source of amusement and tenderness - my older son, Owen (7), who was previously terrified of dogs, now writes “Jitterbug stories” in his free time and willfully solicits her sloppy kisses - but there have also been some unanticipated improvements, like in my relationship with my wife for example. What can I say? Things have gotten better since we’ve gotten the dog, and that includes our sex life.

How could a humble puppy help steam up things in the bedroom? I attribute this surprising increase in intimacy to a few factors:

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Frequent churchgoers frequently fatter
March 24th, 2011
10:18 AM ET

Frequent churchgoers frequently fatter

Young, religiously active people are more likely than their non-religious counterparts to become obese in middle age, according to new research. In fact, frequent religious involvement appears to almost double the risk of obesity compared with little or no involvement.

What is unclear from the new research is why religion might be associated with overeating.

"Churches pay more attention to obvious vices like smoking or drinking," said Matthew Feinstein, lead author of the research and fourth-year medical student at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. "Our best guess about why is that...more frequent participation in church is associated with good works and people may be rewarding themselves with large meals that are more caloric in nature than we would like."

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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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