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More about penis evolution
March 10th, 2011
04:40 PM ET

More about penis evolution

By now you might've read about new research on the genes involved in  the evolution of the human penis. With more than 2,200 comments, our Wednesday story was a talker.

And it wasn't an excuse to say the p-word. Scientists have published a study in the esteemed, peer-reviewed journal Nature that happens to talk about penises. Specifically, they looked at DNA sequences among humans and primate relatives that basically serve as "switches" for other genes.

They focused on two switches that humans lack, but that chimpanzees have. One of these switches, the researchers believe, makes chimpanzees have whiskers and what they call "spines" on the penis. And the other relates to the brain - the absence of a particular DNA strand allowed the human brain to grow larger than the chimpanzee's, the researchers theorize.

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Cancer survivor numbers are up
March 10th, 2011
03:38 PM ET

Cancer survivor numbers are up

More Americans are beating cancer.

The number of cancer survivors in the United States increased to 11.7 million in 2007, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute. That’s compared with 3 million cancer survivors in 1971 and 9.8 million in 2001.

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March 10th, 2011
01:29 PM ET

HCG diet: Pregnancy hormones and 500 calories a day

You may have just come across the hCG diet, a hormone-based, weight-loss program that involves eating less and taking a hormone created from pregnant ladies’ urine.

It has been around since the 1950s, but has picked up steam lately. FULL POST


FDA approves drug to treat lupus
March 10th, 2011
12:06 PM ET

FDA approves drug to treat lupus

The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved the drug Benlysta (belimumab) for the treatment of lupus, a chronic, potentially fatal autoimmune disease that affects about 5 million people across the world and, specifically, about 1.5 million Americans.

“This is a historic day for the millions of people with lupus and their families around the world who have waited more than 52 years for a treatment breakthrough for lupus," said Sandra C. Raymond, president and chief executive officer of the Lupus Foundation of America, in a statement. "Today marks the beginning of a new era of improved diagnosis, prevention, and treatment for the disease." FULL POST


Sexual side effects: A silent epidemic?
March 10th, 2011
11:18 AM ET

Sexual side effects: A silent epidemic?

Ian Kerner, a sexuality counselor and New York Times best-selling author, blogs about sex on Thursdays on The Chart. Read more from him at his website, GoodInBed.

Are meds zapping your mojo? Is a prescription inhibiting your passion? If so, you’re far from alone. More than 27 million Americans  take antidepressant drugs and research suggests that 37 percent of those people experience sexual side effects. And that’s just in the category of antidepressants! When you consider that millions of drugs are prescribed for common medical conditions, such as high blood pressure, and that many of those drugs can lead to sexual dysfunction of some sort, it’s no wonder that nearly 40 million Americans describe themselves as being stuck in sexless marriages.  Many of us may be grappling with a sexual problem and not even realize that a drug or drug combination could be the underlying cause. In this sense, sexual side effects could be a silent epidemic.

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On the Brain: When psychiatrists stop talking
March 10th, 2011
09:05 AM ET

On the Brain: When psychiatrists stop talking

When a psychiatrist compares his office to a bus station, you know something's up. The New York Times has an eye-opening piece about how psychiatrists today mainly prescribe medications and don't have time to talk to patients anymore. Dr. Donald Levin, the centerpiece of the story, keeps telling patients that if they need to delve into their problems, they should see a therapist. Unfortunately, with rigid health insurance structures and limited access to care, that's not always possible.

And given that research has shown that mental health care is best given as a combination of talk therapy and medication, that's a big problem, notes Carol Bernstein, president of the American Psychiatric Association, in a letter to the New York Times.

FULL POST


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Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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