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Get Some Sleep: Do you eat in your sleep?
March 8th, 2011
05:22 PM ET

Get Some Sleep: Do you eat in your sleep?

Lisa Shives, M.D., is the founder of Northshore Sleep Medicine in Evanston, Illinois. She blogs on Tuesdays on The Chart. Read more from her at Dr. Lisa Shives’ Sleep Better Blog.

For Leslie, it all started around menopause:  the fatigue, the weight gain and the eating in the middle of the night.  Sometimes she would have absolutely no memory of getting up to eat, but would find a mess in the kitchen.  Other times, she would feel half-awake but out of control and compelled to get out of bed and find food.

I had a strong suspicion that Leslie had a parasomnia that we call sleep-related eating disorder.  The key features are:  1. Nocturnal eating while asleep or half-asleep and therefore there is no or little recall of the events but there is evidence of eating or there are witnesses. 2. Bizarre and sometimes dangerous things are consumed. 3. Elaborate food preparation often takes place but in a careless, sloppy manner 4. There are often underlying eating disorders and/or a primary sleep disorder.  As she continued her story, I became more convinced that indeed Leslie had this disorder.

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March 8th, 2011
01:00 PM ET

Changes big and small only a month into tri training

When Dr. Sanjay Gupta finished the Nautica New York City Triathlon last year, he called the race "a transformative experience, both mentally and physically." Six weeks after this year's Fit Nation Triathlon Challenge kicked off in Atlanta, one member of the 6-pack has already been taken off medication for his high blood pressure. We wondered what other changes, large or small, the rest of the 6-pack have seen in themselves.

Anastasia Cirricione

Thus far, the biggest change for Stasia Cirricione has been mental.

"I'm gaining a lot of confidence in my body and its abilities. I never thought I'd be able to bike for 75 minutes and then run right after for 15 minutes without stopping. I actually felt AWESOME during the run part. I'm so impressed with the capabilities of my body and I don't know that I would have ever pushed myself to do something like this on my own. I actually look forward to my next workout and enjoy all the aches and pains of getting stronger."

Kendrick Henley

Kendrick Henley has been focused on making lifestyle changes that will last long after the triathlon ends, particularly when it comes to diet. For example, on the day he wrote this blog, he ate soup and half a sandwich for lunch, not the customary cheeseburger he would have chosen months ago.

"The most exciting change that I did not expect occurred when I was getting dressed for work," wrote Kendrick. "I realized that the notch on my belt was too big and I had to tighten it up. That was such a pleasant surprise. I remember when I bought that belt and it was the only belt in stock that big, and I remember being so embarrassed that it was so hard to find. But hopefully soon, my current belt will be too big and just a memory."

Nina Lovel

Nina Lovel can't seem to go anywhere in her small town without a stranger stopping her in the street with words of encouragement or appreciation. All that extra motivation, plus a new, healthy diet, is making Nina's "58 is the new 28" slogan come true.

"I have lost 7 pounds in a month–that is HUGE! All of my clothes are fitting better, I've cinched up most of them as far as they will go, and some favorite pieces are now baggy.... I have become very focused on healthy eating and have banished all but the most frivolous and occasional empty calories from my life. Proof: were my nutrition to be inadequate, I would not have been able to RUN AN ENTIRE 5K, shaving 6 minutes off my previous times, and feeling great at the finish line!

I definitely need more sleep these days, and while it would be simple to ascribe this to increased physical activity, there's more to it than that. This experience is tugging at much more than my swim, bike and running muscles; it is stretching my mind, my heart and my emotions, often to the point of (happy) exhaustion."

Joaquin Brignoni

Joaquin Brignoni has seen small but powerful changes in himself since training began.

"A sense of great accomplishment seems to stay with me throughout the day when I wake up for a 5 a.m. swim or a 6 a.m. track run. Becoming more disciplined with what I choose to eat has also been very empowering. I actually find myself craving healthier foods. It's a strange but welcomed feeling.
Physically, I'm becoming stronger, lighter and more energetic with every workout. I've managed to lose another 5 pounds and my prehypertension has dropped to a normal level. I'm really amazed and excited about that.

My biggest challenge so far is getting enough sleep! I consider myself somewhat of a night owl but late nights just don't mix well with my new healthy lifestyle. The excitement alone can no longer trump the rest my body really needs. So, I'll focus my energy on getting to bed earlier over the next couple of weeks."

Kas Seerla

Kas Seerla balances life as a stay-at-home mother with her triathlon training. It's been an adjustment for her family but by going to the gym six days a week, some workouts have already gotten easier.

"Of the three [exercises] (swim, bike, run), I would say I've made improvements with the swim. A month ago, I would do a lap and have to wait for five minutes to catch my breath before I could do another lap. Now my workouts are about 45 minutes and I can do 600 yards. Of course I'm still stopping a lot but still a big improvement from a month ago."

Dr. Scott Zahn

Aside from stopping one of his medications for high blood pressure, Scott Zahn is seeing other, exciting changes in himself.

"I think I have been brainwashed by Laura Cozik, CNN Fit Nation athletic director. I look forward to the workouts and the variety of swim, run and bike keeps it from getting monotonous. In the last two weeks I had planned two rest days, but when those days came I was antsy and needed to do something to get my heart racing.

In the last month there have been more fitness changes than physical changes. I recover faster from my workouts and am able to do more without maxing out my heart rate. I am stronger and feel better. I continue to lose weight, but for about two weeks my weight was stable. This was a little discouraging, but then for no apparent reason I dropped four pounds in just a few days. I needed to put another hole in the belt. That is the second time I have needed to do that since this whole process started! Yesterday I bought a new belt, one that fits."


March 8th, 2011
12:08 PM ET

Human Factor: In diving, Louganis found platform

In the Human Factor, Dr. Sanjay Gupta introduces you to a survivor who has overcome tremendous odds. Confronting a life obstacle – injury, illness or other hardship – they tapped their inner strength and found resilience they didn’t know they possessed. Be inspired by their successes, as we have been.  This week, we focus on four-time Olympic gold medal diver Greg Louganis.  In 1995 autobiography, Louganis announced to the world he was gay and had  HIV.  Since then, Louganis has gone on to become an actor, activist and champion dog trainer.  Recently, he returned to the pool to coach.  Today he talks about overcoming adversity and what he hopes others will learn from his story.

The one thing that I've always said is that as a diver, I hope people remember me as being strong and graceful.  As a person, [I hope they remember me as] making a difference.  Fortunately, with my success in diving, it's given me a platform to be heard, to teach tolerance and celebrating diversity.

I feel that my biggest success was my book because the diving, all the Olympic competitions and the Olympic medals, the world championships and all that stuff that gave me a platform to be heard.  I think that in writing the book, I shared so much on depression and abusive relationships, dealing with my sexuality, my sexual identity, who I was and finding myself.  All of those things, by sharing that allowed people to realize if they were dealing with similar situations, they were not alone.      


March 8th, 2011
11:54 AM ET

Could first-grade traumas cause PTSD?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Tuesdays, it's Dr. Charles Raison, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Emory University, and an expert in the mind-body connection for health.

Question sked by Elissia Cave of Nebraska:

I was bullied when I was in the first grade really badly, and on the last day that year (the end of the year was when it was at the worst), my sisters and I were taken from school and put into foster care for over a year because our parents had been neglecting us. I've been researching it, and I think I'm exhibiting symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. Would what happened to me be traumatic enough to cause PTSD?

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Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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