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What the Yuck: Am I going deaf?
February 25th, 2011
04:52 PM ET

What the Yuck: Am I going deaf?

Too embarrassed to ask your doctor about sex, body quirks, or the latest celeb health fad? In a regular feature and a new book, "What the Yuck?!," Health magazine medical editor Dr. Roshini Raj tackles your most personal and provocative questions. Send 'em to Dr. Raj at whattheyuck@health.com.

Q: I find I'm listening to my iPod at higher volumes lately - does that mean I'm going deaf?

FULL POST


February 25th, 2011
03:04 PM ET

Fit Friday: Healthier lunches bust in Chicago, tackling non-payments with cheese sandwiches

It’s nothing new to hear kids sum up their cafeteria food in one word - “nasty.”

After all, some school lunches looks like bland, pre-made slop devoid of any nutrition.

But a major overhaul to serve healthier foods at the Chicago Public Schools has faced new problems. The public school system stopped serving doughnuts and Pop-Tarts, and lunch sales dropped “by about 5 percentage points since the previous year, or more than 20,000 lunches a day,” according to Chicago Tribune. FULL POST


AAAS: Brains, asthma, and bedbug sex
This Fab@Home device, from the Computational Synthesis Laboratory at Cornell University, printed a model of an ear and a pinwheel out of silicon during a press briefing. This technology is capable of printing objects out of cartilage.
February 25th, 2011
01:30 PM ET

AAAS: Brains, asthma, and bedbug sex

It's no wonder journalists come from as far away as Sweden, Uganda and Australia to attend the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting. This year's conference, which took place earlier in the week, was a truly special meeting of minds.

There was so much to learn from the scientific sessions, which showcase leading researchers explaining everything from the neuroscience of stuttering to treatments for obsessive compulsive disorder to oral sex leading to oral cancers.

FULL POST


February 25th, 2011
01:19 PM ET

PTSD in women may have genetic link
February 25th, 2011
12:25 PM ET

PTSD in women may have genetic link

After a single traumatic event, as many as one-fourth of people exposed will develop post-traumatic stress disorder, a psychiatric disorder characterized by anxiety, hyperarousal and persistent unwanted memories.

Scientists are looking for genes or gene pathways that can help better predict PTSD. A new study in the journal Nature suggests one such route in women: through a protein called pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, which is known to regulate the cellular stress response. Women are more likely to have PTSD in general; 10% of women and 5% of men develop the condition sometime in their lives.

FULL POST


NFL to require sideline test after head blows
February 25th, 2011
09:47 AM ET

NFL to require sideline test after head blows

Dr. Richard Ellenbogen and Dr. Hunt Batjer talk to CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta about the league’s concussion policy, part of a special “Sanjay Gupta, MD – Head Games: The Truth About Concussions,”  Saturday at  7:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. ET and Sunday at 7:30 a.m.

Under increasing pressure from players, medical professionals and even fans, on Friday the National Football League took a step towards clearing up its policy on treating head injuries. Starting this fall, every team will be required to use the same neurologic test to determine – on the field – whether an injured player may return to the game.

"It's simple, 'go or no-go,' says Dr. Richard Ellenbogen, co-chair of the NFL's Head, Neck and Spine Medical Committee, who adds that the exam was developed in response to a direct request from NFL commissioner Roger Goodell.

NFL committee co-chairs: "In doubt, take the player out"

"The NFL Sidelines Concussion Exam" is a battery of simple tests evaluating concentration, basic thinking skills and balance. It also includes a questionnaire that asks about concussion symptoms. It's designed to be given on the field, within a 6-to-8 minute window. “The individual pieces have all been validated through research, but they’ve never been used together like this,” says Ellenbogen.

FULL POST


February 25th, 2011
08:24 AM ET

What vitamins, supplements should I take after weight-loss surgery?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Friday, it's Dr. Melina Jampolis, a physician nutrition specialist.

Asked by Paulina Thomas of Jacksonville

What vitamins and supplements are recommended for people who have had weight loss surgery? And how much?
FULL POST


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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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