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CT scans, MRIs coming to docs' mobile devices
February 4th, 2011
05:49 PM ET

CT scans, MRIs coming to docs' mobile devices

The Food and Drug Administration approved a new mobile application that will allow doctors to look at medical images on their iPhones, iPads and the iPod Touch, the agency announced Friday.

Doctors will now be able to view images remotely from a number of machines including computed tomography (CT scans), magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs) and positron emission tomography–better known as PET scans, and make a diagnosis. The new app, called the Mobile MIM, is the first to be cleared by the FDA for use with mobile devices.

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Flu and You: How flu spreads among kids
February 4th, 2011
05:35 PM ET

Flu and You: How flu spreads among kids

Flu activity in the United States increased in the week between January 23 to 29, reported the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Six flu-related children’s deaths were reported that week.  During this flu season, which started in October, there have been 19 confirmed pediatric deaths.

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What the Yuck: Is there lead in my lipstick?
February 4th, 2011
03:10 PM ET

What the Yuck: Is there lead in my lipstick?

Too embarrassed to ask your doctor about sex, body quirks, or the latest celeb health fad? In a regular feature and a new book, "What the Yuck?!," Health magazine medical editor Dr. Roshini Raj tackles your most personal and provocative questions. Send 'em to Dr. Raj at whattheyuck@health.com.

Q: Is it true there's lead in my red lipstick?

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New research sheds light on RP blindness
February 4th, 2011
02:34 PM ET

New research sheds light on RP blindness

Scientists say they have found another clue to solving the puzzle that causes the slow loss of vision in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) as seen in the image above.  University of Miami genetic researchers have identified a new gene  that causes this form of blindness. People who suffer from this condition experience impaired night vision, a loss of peripheral vision and eventually lose their central vision too.

"Identification of this gene is yet another tiny step in identifying the specific cause of retinal disorders in all people who have them," says Dr. Richard Lewis,  a ophthalmologist at the Baylor College of Medicine and a spokesman for the American Academy of Ophthalmology.   He says the gene discovery offers insight into a mechanism or defect that doesn't function properly or normally but he adds this is just one of all retinitis pigmentosas and there are at least 167 known genes for hereditary retinal diseases.

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Fit Friday: Supersized players clash
February 4th, 2011
01:48 PM ET

Fit Friday: Supersized players clash

Americans love super-sized drinks, the spectacle of the Super Bowl and our super-sized players.  But when we're done indulging in the Super Bowl, we also try to think of ways to get healthier - by drinking our vitamins and deducting money from the paycheck to work out.

Super-sized players for Super Bowl

When the Green Bay Packers won Super Bowl I in 1967, their heaviest player weighed 260 pounds.  How times have changed.

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February 4th, 2011
11:48 AM ET

Health quiz: How's your nose for news?

This week the USDA told us to eat less salt, but how much is OK?  Take our quiz to test your knowledge of that and other news, plus some health trivia questions.  Good luck.


Filed under: Health Care Costs • Health Quiz

February 4th, 2011
08:31 AM ET

Are nonsodium salts healthier than traditional?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Friday, it's Dr. Melina Jampolis, a physician nutrition specialist.

Question asked by Kristan of Atlanta, Georgia

My sister and I were talking about salt. She has noticed that sea salt is currently being marketed as a healthy, or trendy, food additive, but can't figure out if there's any real science behind the marketing. Are nonsodium salts, like magnesium chloride and potassium chloride, any healthier than traditional sodium chloride? People with, say, high blood pressure are told to stick to low-sodium diets. But is it the sodium, or is it a different quality that causes the increased risk? FULL POST


'Lifestyle' cancers increasing in developing countries
February 4th, 2011
12:01 AM ET

'Lifestyle' cancers increasing in developing countries

Friday is World Cancer Day.  A new report from the American Cancer Society says cancers that are usually more common in developed countries such as lung and breast cancer, are now on the rise in developing countries and will continue to increase unless preventive measures are taken immediately.

7.6 million people died worldwide of cancer in 2008.  The number is expected to rise to 13.2 million deaths by 2030.  Experts say that's because more people will be on the planet and they will be living longer.

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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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