home
RSS
'The King's Speech' a victory for stutterers
February 28th, 2011
05:29 PM ET

'The King's Speech' a victory for stutterers

"The King's Speech," which took home four Academy Awards including best picture, made important strides for the stuttering community, organizations dedicated to spreading awareness say.

Sunday's awards ceremony was "an eloquently golden night for people who stutter," said Jane Fraser, president of the Stuttering Foundation of America, in a statement.

FULL POST


Once-dropping U.S. breast cancer rates now stable
February 28th, 2011
04:39 PM ET

Once-dropping U.S. breast cancer rates now stable

After a large drop in U.S. breast cancer rates among non-Hispanic white women between 2002 and 2003, those rates did not continue to decline between 2003 and 2007. Those are the findings of a new study from the American Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute that appears online in the publication Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention.

In July 2002 results were published from the Women’s Health Initiative, a long-term national study,  finding that postmenopausal women who used combined hormone therapy – estrogen plus progestin - had negative health effects including higher risk for breast cancer, heart disease, stroke, blood clots, and urinary incontinence.

FULL POST


Airline passengers exposed to measles in 4 states
February 28th, 2011
03:59 PM ET

Airline passengers exposed to measles in 4 states

Public health officials in four states are contacting airline passengers and employees who might have been exposed to measles in various airports last week.   A 27-year-old woman who was not immunized against the disease and had recently returned from a trip overseas passed through Virginia, Maryland, Colorado and New Mexico.

CNN contacted the health departments of each state and here's what you need to know.  All times are local.

FULL POST


Starting triathon? Here's your shopping list
February 28th, 2011
03:37 PM ET

Starting triathon? Here's your shopping list

Are you ready to train for a triathlon, just like the CNN 6-pack? Want to change your lifestyle? Become a role model? Get super fit and healthy? If you answered yes, then it’s time to go SHOPPING. Woo hoo!!!

Your first year in triathlon is an expense. You’ll need a bike, a wetsuit, cycling shoes, sneakers, a helmet, and a few accessories. You can opt to borrow stuff from friends, and feel free to start with the most basic gear for more savings. Once you have everything, though, you’re good to go for years to come.

Shopping…my favorite part! Here's your list:

FULL POST


More on the criminal brain: Nature vs. nurture
February 28th, 2011
12:49 PM ET

More on the criminal brain: Nature vs. nurture

Whether a criminal's nature is biologically ingrained, and perhaps even inherited, is a highly controversial notion that's now getting serious scientific attention. We had a flood of questions and comments last week about recent research on the topic, which shows that it may be possible to predict which children are likely to become criminals or psychopaths based on brain anatomy and genetics.

Adrian Raine, psychologist at the University of Pennsylvania, is conducting some fascinating experiments to figure out the brain signatures of criminal behavior, and what kinds of interventions might prevent people from ever becoming offenders. I posed some of your questions, and my own, to him, after we all had more time to think critically about the issues.

FULL POST


February 28th, 2011
08:38 AM ET

How can I treat itchy eyes this spring?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Mondays, it's pediatrician Dr. Jennifer Shu.

Asked by Henna, from Virginia

My eyes get very itchy when the weather changes in the spring. What's the best way to treat this? Oral medicines make me very sleepy.

FULL POST


Parents, don't fear all fevers, pediatricians say
February 28th, 2011
12:01 AM ET

Parents, don't fear all fevers, pediatricians say

When parents notice their child has flushed cheeks and is hot to the touch they often anxiously reach for the thermometer to check for a fever and a pain reliever to bring it down. But "fever phobia" may be getting in the way of properly treating children, according to a new study in the medical journal Pediatrics.

“Fever is the body's normal response to an illness, so it doesn't mean it's a bad thing. It's how your body fights the infection," explains study author Dr. Janice Sullivan, professor of pediatric critical care medicine at the University of Louisville in Kentucky.

FULL POST


More self-aware people quit smoking easier
February 27th, 2011
01:00 PM ET

More self-aware people quit smoking easier

How your brain responds to anti-smoking messages may be useful in helping to kick the habit, a new study in the journal Nature Neuroscience reports.

"People who are more likely to potentially see the messages as relevant to them, they are more likely to quit," said lead author Hannah Faye Chua of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. "They could feel like, 'This is me, this is how I am right now, this is how I would like to change.'"

FULL POST


What the Yuck: Am I going deaf?
February 25th, 2011
04:52 PM ET

What the Yuck: Am I going deaf?

Too embarrassed to ask your doctor about sex, body quirks, or the latest celeb health fad? In a regular feature and a new book, "What the Yuck?!," Health magazine medical editor Dr. Roshini Raj tackles your most personal and provocative questions. Send 'em to Dr. Raj at whattheyuck@health.com.

Q: I find I'm listening to my iPod at higher volumes lately - does that mean I'm going deaf?

FULL POST


February 25th, 2011
03:04 PM ET

Fit Friday: Healthier lunches bust in Chicago, tackling non-payments with cheese sandwiches

It’s nothing new to hear kids sum up their cafeteria food in one word - “nasty.”

After all, some school lunches looks like bland, pre-made slop devoid of any nutrition.

But a major overhaul to serve healthier foods at the Chicago Public Schools has faced new problems. The public school system stopped serving doughnuts and Pop-Tarts, and lunch sales dropped “by about 5 percentage points since the previous year, or more than 20,000 lunches a day,” according to Chicago Tribune. FULL POST


   older posts »
Advertisement
About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

Advertisement
Advertisement