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January 27th, 2011
05:37 PM ET

Alzheimer's called 'defining disease' of baby boomers

As any family who has gone through it can tell you, Alzheimer's disease is tragic on a number of levels.  Once vibrant men and women become shells of the people they once were.  Not only do memories fade, there also is anger.  And loneliness.  Former first lady Nancy Reagan famously referred to it as "the long goodbye."

As the first baby boomers turn 65 this year, a new report suggests they will be especially hit hard.  One out of eight boomers will develop the disease, according to the report released by the Alzheimer's Association.  That comes to about 10 million people.  Of those who reach 85, nearly one in two will get it.  "Alzheimer's is a tragic epidemic that has no survivors.  It is as much a thief as a killer," says Harry Johns, president and CEO of the Alzheimer's Association, in a press release.

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13 Iowa football players hospitalized after workout
January 27th, 2011
03:53 PM ET

13 Iowa football players hospitalized after workout

Thirteen University of Iowa  football players were hospitalized after a strenuous workout this week.

They were found to have  rhabdomyolosis, several days after taking part in an off-season workout, according to CNN affiliate KWWL.

When a muscle ruptures, it releases its cellular content, including particles called myoglobin, into the body. These particles get caught in the kidneys and can block the organ's functions and in worst cases, cause death. FULL POST


Even babies understand power
January 27th, 2011
02:00 PM ET

Even babies understand power

Whether it's a physical fight or a power struggle, intuition tells us that size matters. Babies may agree, a new study suggests.

Even as early as 10 months old, children seem to have concepts of social dominance and hierarchy, Danish researchers say in a study published in the journal Science.

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The price tag for the first face transplant in the U.S. is...
January 27th, 2011
12:07 PM ET

The price tag for the first face transplant in the U.S. is...

Face transplant: $349,959

A year’s supply of immune-suppressing drugs: $14,000 – $20,000

Being able to breathe, to eat and to feel better about appearing in public: priceless

After celebrating the initial success of the first face transplant in the United States, the doctors who performed the operation assessed the financial cost in a report published in the American Journal of Transplantation. FULL POST


Dating with science on your side
January 27th, 2011
11:24 AM ET

Dating with science on your side

Ian Kerner, a sexuality counselor and New York Times best-selling author, blogs about sex on Thursdays on The Chart. Read more from him at his website, GoodInBed.

Anyone who’s single and dating knows it’s a numbers game. All it takes is one person to set you on the path toward happily ever after - or to give you another dating nightmare story.

But how many dates do you have to go on to find “the one”? And how do you know for sure that once you do meet Mr. or Ms. Right, a more attractive, more compatible prospect won’t pop up right around the corner?

Science can help us streamline the process. Cognitive science all-stars Peter Todd, Ph.D., of Indiana University in Bloomington, and Geoffrey Miller, Ph.D., of the University of New Mexico, used advanced computer simulations to determine the best approach to find lasting love.

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Why Americans aren’t living longer
January 27th, 2011
09:16 AM ET

Why Americans aren’t living longer

With plenty of food, more money spent on health care  and modern medical innovations, it seems as if we should be living longer.

But compared to our international counterparts, we aren't. Americans lag behind other industrialized countries including Australia, Canada,  Japan and France, in life expectancy.

A new report from the National Research Council finds that Americans fall short on life expectancy compared with other high-income countries because of two vices – smoking and obesity.

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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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