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New Facebook furor over breastfeeding images
January 5th, 2011
04:54 PM ET

New Facebook furor over breastfeeding images

Our friends at Parenting.com are taking note of the latest round in the social media  battle over photos of breastfeeding women.

Last weekend,  Facebook,  deleted The LeakyB@@b, a support page for nursing mothers, saying the images on the pages violated its terms of service.

Facebook took removed the page on Sunday, then put it back up Tuesday, saying its deletion was a mistake. Then Facebook took it down again Tuesday night. And on Wednesday, put it back up in the early afternoon. In the meantime other groups popped up to support the Boob.

Read Parenting's full account of  the page's roller coaster ride.

We'll echo Parenting's question:  Moms, have you or any of your friends ever had any breastfeeding photos deleted by Facebook? Do you consider photos of nursing to be obscene?


Filed under: Breastfeeding • Children's Health

On the brain: Value and kindness
January 5th, 2011
04:14 PM ET

On the brain: Value and kindness

This week we look at how the brain assigns value to objects, how to be kind to others, and a device that lets you examine your own attention.

A shopper's brain
Here's more on amygdala, that ever-important almond-shaped structure in both hemispheres of the brain. Lately it's been associated with  political views, fear (or lack thereof), and social networks. Now, it's also implicated in shopping, Discovery News reports. It seems that individual neurons change their activity in the amygdala with the perceived value of an object.

FULL POST


Aging facial bones could cause wrinkles, crow's feet
January 5th, 2011
02:06 PM ET

Aging facial bones could cause wrinkles, crow's feet

Beauty is more than skin deep.

The signs of aging – sagging skin and wrinkles - may come from deteriorating facial bones, according to a study released Tuesday in the medical journal, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

CT scans of facial bones in 20 young, 20 middle-aged and 20 older people were compared.  Dr. Robert Shaw Jr., a plastic surgeon at the University of Rochester Medical Center and his co-authors  found that the facial bones - much as other bones in the body - shrink with age.

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Balding may be a stem cell problem
January 5th, 2011
10:07 AM ET

Balding may be a stem cell problem

If you're a guy who's lost a lot of hair, there may be hope in getting it back, via stem cells.

New research in the Journal of Clinical Investigation suggests that male-pattern baldness may result from stem cells in the scalp failing to give rise to progenitor cells, which are responsible for growing hair.

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January 5th, 2011
09:32 AM ET

How many stages are there in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Wednesdays, it's Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical officer at the
American Cancer Society.

Question asked by Paula Holman-Yorba of San Bernardino, California

How many stages are there in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma?

FULL POST


Are we fooling ourselves about healthy eating?
January 5th, 2011
09:30 AM ET

Are we fooling ourselves about healthy eating?

Americans could be fooling themselves when it comes to healthy eating, according to a Consumer Reports survey.

Nearly 90 percent of 1,234 U.S. adults surveyed said they were eating a “somewhat," "very," or "extremely" healthy diet. Only 11 percent described their diet as “not very” or “not at all” healthy.

Most people made efforts to eat healthier. For example, 60 percent of the participants said they chose whole grains over white rice or refined carbs. More than half also reported that they ate five or more servings of fruits and vegetables a day - although this could also be a miscalculation of serving sizes by respondents.

A CDC survey conducted last year found that only 26 percent of adults ate vegetables at least three times a day.

FULL POST


Anti-cocaine vaccine shows promise in mice
January 5th, 2011
08:56 AM ET

Anti-cocaine vaccine shows promise in mice

A new vaccine shows promise for producing immunity to cocaine’s highly addictive effects. The study - in mice - is published online in Molecular Therapy, one of the Nature journals.

Cocaine is a powerful addictive stimulant that is snorted, smoked or injected. When cocaine enters the central nervous system it produces a sense of euphoria, pleasure and increased energy in the user. It also can cause dangerous increases in blood pressure and heart rate. In 2008, 5.3 million Americans age 12 and older had abused cocaine in any form and 1.1 million had abused crack at least once in the year prior to being surveyed, according to data from the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

FULL POST


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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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