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Alternatives to mercury dental fillings
December 16th, 2010
05:03 PM ET

Alternatives to mercury dental fillings

Mercury fillings have had a murky history. Used for more than a century, the American Dental Association says they're safe, but all you have to do is google "dangers of mercury fillings" to see that a whole host of people disagree.

Like the dentists' group, the Food and Drug Administration has said mercury fillings are safe, but now an FDA committee is advising a second look at the issue based on  new data.

While the FDA considers whether they want to mull over the safety of mercury fillings, we empowered patients can take action of our own. FULL POST


Doctors and Facebook: Is there a privacy risk?
December 16th, 2010
02:32 PM ET

Doctors and Facebook: Is there a privacy risk?

Doctors with a Facebook profile could be jeopardizing their relationship with patients if they don't correctly use the website's privacy settings, according to a study in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

Study authors surveyed 200 residents and fellows at the Rouen University Hospital, France, in October 2009.  The overwhelming majority had a profile on the online social media website Facebook and almost all displayed their real names, birth dates, a personal photograph and their current university.

FULL POST


On Christmas, the lonely seek refuge in hospitals
December 16th, 2010
12:00 PM ET

On Christmas, the lonely seek refuge in hospitals

Two days before Christmas, Ishani Kar-Purkayastha a junior doctor at an English hospital, prepares to dig through a stack of patient papers. She remembers the night:

The pre-Christmas emptying of the hospital is well underway. People want to be at home.

Instead, the young doctor is interrupted by a woman. “Doris,” who complains of aching in her shoulder.  Doris has been at the hospital for three weeks. FULL POST


Sex ed in the age of Snooki
December 16th, 2010
08:20 AM ET

Sex ed in the age of Snooki

These days, all you have to do is turn on the TV or pick up a gossip magazine to see the future of our youth—and let me tell you, it’s not pretty. In the age of Snooki, "Girls Gone Wild," and Tila Tequila, where on Earth is a young woman supposed to find positive female role models? And how are our boys going to grow up to respect female sexuality when the girls themselves seem to be throwing all sexual caution to the wind? From sexting to the mainstreaming of amateur pornography, a new culture of raunchiness has emerged, one in which women aren’t just participating—they’re often taking the lead.

At Good in Bed, it’s a trend that has many of us concerned. In one of my favorite books on the subject, "Female Chauvinist Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture," journalist Ariel Levy argues that our culture’s model of female sexuality encourages women to perform for men—think strip clubs and porn. And, writes Jennifer Egan in her New York Times review of the book, “Women have bought into this by altering their bodies surgically and cosmetically, and— more insidiously—by confusing sexual power with actual power, so that embracing this caricaturish form of sexuality becomes, in their minds, a perverse kind of feminism.” But, as Levy points out, “‘Raunchy’ and ‘liberated’ are not synonyms. It is worth asking ourselves if this bawdy world of boobs and gams we have resurrected reflects how far we've come, or how far we have left to go.”

FULL POST


Caffeine doesn't worsen bedwetting, but moderation advised
December 16th, 2010
12:01 AM ET

Caffeine doesn't worsen bedwetting, but moderation advised

Drinking caffeine doesn't seem to affect how often young children wet the bed according to a study in the Journal of Pediatrics. But before your child heads to the kitchen for a caffeine fix, know that the researchers recommend children drink less caffeine, not more.

Clinicians at an outpatient pediatric clinic in Nebraska asked parents of more than 200 children how often their child drank caffeinated beverages and wet the bed. About 75% of the children drank caffeine.  Children aged 5 to 7 consumed about a can of soda a day while 8- to 12-year-olds drank almost three times that amount. Though caffeine is a diuretic – meaning it increases the need to urinate – children who drank it did not wet the bed more often than children who had no daily caffeine.

But the investigators are cautious about the results.

FULL POST


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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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