home
RSS
FDA cracks down on tainted dietary supplements
December 15th, 2010
05:45 PM ET

FDA cracks down on tainted dietary supplements

Manufacturers who put tainted or undeclared ingredients into dietary supplements were warned Wednesday by the Food and Drug Administration that they can no longer market them as such. The FDA has received reports on well over 100 products over the last few years, a number of them detailed serious injuries, even deaths. In fact, since 2007 the agency has sent out consumer alerts about 300 adulterated products.

"These tainted products can cause serious adverse effects, including strokes, organ failure and death," said FDA Commissioner Dr. Margaret Hamburg. "The manufacturers selling these tainted products are operating outside the law."

Concern over the growing problem has led the agency to send a letter to five major trade associations - the Counil for Responsible Nutrition, Natural Products Assocation, United Natural Produdcts Alliance, Consumer Healthcare Products Association and American Herbal Products Association - whose member companies make dietary supplements, warning them of the problem and of "their legal obligations and their responsibility to prevent tainted products from reaching the US market."

FULL POST


On the Brain: Thinking more creatively
December 15th, 2010
05:17 PM ET

On the Brain: Thinking more creatively

Just want to have fun? Two pieces of recent research suggest that getting in a good mood helps you perform better at certain tasks and be more creative.

A new study in Psychological Science exposed participants to music clips and YouTube videos that were supposed to put people in specific mood states.  For instance, a video for a laughing baby was "positive," "Antiques Roadshow" TV show was "neutral," and a news report of a Chinese earthquake was "negative." After volunteers listened to music and watched clips characteristic of one of these three moods, they had to do a task that involved learning a rule to categorize a particular pattern.

FULL POST


Repeat exams for brain dead patients bad for organ donation
December 15th, 2010
04:01 PM ET

Repeat exams for brain dead patients bad for organ donation

For brain dead patients, a second examination to declare death is not only unnecessary but may also have the unwanted effect of steering family members away from donating the patient's organs, according to a new study published in the journal Neurology.

Not one brain dead patient in the study recovered brain function between the first and second exams.

"This is a game changer," said Dr. Dana Lustbader, the North Shore University Hospital chief of palliative medicine, and lead study author, via email. "A single examination is sufficient to diagnose brain death and should be the medical standard. There is simply no benefit to a second exam. None."

FULL POST


CDC: 1 in 6 Americans get food poisoning annually
December 15th, 2010
03:22 PM ET

CDC: 1 in 6 Americans get food poisoning annually

About 48 million Americans get sick from foodborne illness each year according to the first new data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) since 1999.

According to CDC’s 2011 Estimates of Foodborne Disease, 1 in 6 Americans will get sick from known and unknown bacteria, viruses and microbes each year resulting in about 128,000 hospitalizations and about 3,000 deaths. This new data was released by the CDC online Wednesday (the two reports summarizing their results will be published in the CDC's Emerging Infectious Disease Journal in January, which is why the numbers are called “2011 estimates”).

FULL POST


Woman sues McDonald's over Happy Meals
December 15th, 2010
02:04 PM ET

Woman sues McDonald's over Happy Meals

A California woman is suing McDonald's claiming the fast-food giant uses toys to market directly to young children. Monet Parham, a Sacramento, California, mother of two small children filed the lawsuit Wednesday in San Francisco along with health, nutrition and food safety advocates Center for Science in the Public Interest . CSPI is seeking court approval to proceed as a class action.

Parham, a 41-year old state employee, says her kids repeatedly ask for Happy Meals, mainly for the toys. "We have to say no to our kids so many times and McDonald's makes that so much harder to do. I object to the fact that McDonald's is getting into my kids' heads without my permission and actually changing what my kids want to eat."

FULL POST


Why HIV advance is not a universal cure
December 15th, 2010
11:31 AM ET

Why HIV advance is not a universal cure

The internet is buzzing about an HIV-infected man who may have gotten rid of his disease through a bone marrow transplant. But the procedures he went through do not represent a cure for all HIV/AIDS patients, as they are risky and not proven to work in everyone. Also, the disease could still be lurking the patient's body, doctors say.

The news about Timothy Ray Brown, a 44-year-old American living in Berlin, first surfaced in 2008, when his doctors reported about his case.  Here's what happened with Brown, who is HIV positive and broke his silence in a recent article with the German magazine Stern .  He is battling a cancer called acute myeloid leukemia. Doctors first treated him high-dose chemotherapy, but when that failed, turned to a bone marrow transplant (which contains stem cells) in 2007.

FULL POST


Marijuana use overtakes smoking in teens
December 15th, 2010
09:01 AM ET

Marijuana use overtakes smoking in teens

Marijuana use among high school-aged kids is on the rise, according to a new study, and has overtaken cigarette smoking among 12th-graders specifically.

The Monitoring the Future Survey – compiled from 46,000  anonymous questionnaires given to teens – found that 8% of  eighth-graders say they've smoked marijuana within the past 30 days, up from 6.5% just last year. More than 16.7% of 10th-graders and 21.4% of 12th graders say they've smoked pot within the last month as well.

FULL POST


December 15th, 2010
08:36 AM ET

How long can a stent stay in the body?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. Today, it's Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical officer at the American Cancer Society.

Question asked by Billy L. Hagler of Tennessee:

How long can a stent stay in the body? What is a sign of a stent closing up in the artery?

FULL POST


Advertisement
About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

Advertisement
Advertisement