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A mom with HIV and a 'miracle' healthy birth
December 1st, 2010
03:31 PM ET

A mom with HIV and a 'miracle' healthy birth



Fortunata Kasege was just 22 years old when she arrived in this country 13 years ago from Tanzania.  A newlywed with a baby on the way.  She knew her life was about to change. What she didn't know was how much.  A visit to a prenatal clinic in Houston, Texas, revealed that she was HIV positive.

"I was horrified,” she remembers.  “I felt dizzy–and fell out of my chair.  And then I started to cry.  I thought about my unborn baby and I cried for her.  How would she survive?"

But it was 1997, and women in the United States had access to drugs that prevented mother-to-child transmission.  "The nurse told us treatment was available to keep us healthy, and that we could protect our unborn baby from contracting HIV," Kasege says.

That treatment saved Fortunata's life and the life of her unborn child.  "It was hard for me to believe such a miracle was possible,” she says.  “At that time in Africa, children who were born from mothers living with HIV became infected as well and died just a few years later."

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December 1st, 2010
03:27 PM ET

Art as healing after Haiti earthquake

Philippe Dodard couldn't pick up a paint brush in the month following the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. Many of his friends perished as a result of the disaster, and he found himself having no reaction when he would get calls about a new death.

"It’s only when I started painting, all of my emotions that were buried inside started coming out," he said.

Dodard, a prominent, internationally recognized Haitian artist who works in Port-au-Prince, is participating in Haiti Art Expo 2010, an event taking place this weekend in Miami, Florida. The collection features works by Dodard and many other Haitian artists, as well as American artists. All of the proceeds from the sales of these works will go toward refugees and artists who have lost their homes because of the earthquake.

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New study: One step closer to measuring concussion impact
December 1st, 2010
12:06 PM ET

New study: One step closer to measuring concussion impact

One of the vexing realities when it comes to concussion is that its impact on the brain is impossible to measure. There is no MRI, no X-ray, no test to describe how it might cause brain damage. That could change, according to a new, small study presented at the Radiological Society of North America annual meeting.

"It is an exciting, albeit very early, development for an injury that today is considered invisible," said lead author Alexander Lin, assistant professor of radiology at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

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Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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