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November 29th, 2010
04:19 PM ET

Eating disorders increasing for children and teens

Eating disorders are on the rise among children and teens, according to a report published in Pediatrics Monday. Disorders such as anorexia and bulimia are increasing in male children and minorities, and also are occurring in countries where such cases have not been seen, according to the report.

Lead author, Dr. David Rosen noted that eating disorders also are beginning younger meaning below the age of 12.

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November 29th, 2010
04:13 PM ET

Confusion about Weight Watchers and overall diet advice

Confused about diets? What else is new?

Here's one comment from the announcement about the Weight Watchers points overhaul.

Daniela: Make up your mind, CNN...you just wrote a story about the professor who proved to us that the Twinkie Diet works the opposite way. I know you are just reporting on this, but can you at least make some type of cross reference to the previous story so we aren't confused. FULL POST


Hormone heightens memories of mom
November 29th, 2010
04:07 PM ET

Hormone heightens memories of mom

You may have heard of the "cuddle hormone" or the "bonding hormone." It's the brain chemical oxytocin, and it affects attachment between two people. You get a rush of oxytocin from a hug, for example,  because of the  emotional connection that you have with a particular person.

But new research suggests that oxytocin doesn't have the same effects on everyone. Oxytocin may also heighten social memories, says a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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November 29th, 2010
03:30 PM ET

Aging partially reversed in mice. Are humans next?


Could mice in a Boston laboratory hold the key to people living longer? Scientists think it's possible. Researchers at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute say for the first time, they have partially reversed the aging process in mice. In these mice, brain disease was reversed, the sense of smell was restored; the mice even got their fertility back. The study appears in the journal Nature.

“What we have learned is that there’s a point of return for even aged tissues,” said Dr. Ronald DePinho, director of Dana-Farber’s Belfer Institute of Applied Cancer Science and professor of medicine and genetics at Harvard Medical School.

But before you head to Boston to see if you can get in on the action, there are a few things worth noting. First, these weren't your typical mice. For the experiment, scientists tweaked the telomerase gene in mice, which maintains the protective caps called telomeres that shield the end of chromosomes. As we age, that tip degenerates, opening the door for all kinds of hallmarks of aging, such as gray hair, organ degeneration, cognitive decline and infertility.

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Walking may slow brain decline
November 29th, 2010
02:45 PM ET

Walking may slow brain decline

Three studies presented Monday at the Radiological Society of North America’s annual meeting use imaging techniques to show how exercise can affect our bodies and brains.

Walking may slow cognitive decline in adults diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease, as well as benefiting brains of healthy adults.

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November 29th, 2010
08:43 AM ET

What are the chances my family will get my strep throat?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Mondays, it's pediatrician Dr. Jennifer Shu.

Question asked by Yvonne, Stone Mountain, Georgia

I recently got diagnosed with strep throat and am taking antibiotics. Will the rest of the family get it also? I had a sore throat but no fever. My husband and kids aren't complaining of any problems.

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November 29th, 2010
12:01 AM ET

Weight Watchers overhauls Point system

After 13 years on the same Point system, Weight Watchers introduced an overhaul of its weight-loss program Monday, saying more has become known about the science behind weight loss.

Weight Watchers assigns “Points” to food, based on calories. In its new PointsPlus system, fruits and vegetables will carry zero Points; the program will now calculate Points based on macronutrients such as proteins and carbohydrates instead of relying solely on calories, fat and fiber.

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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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