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Lack of vitamin D linked to whites' stroke death
November 14th, 2010
03:55 PM ET

Lack of vitamin D linked to whites' stroke death

Vitamin D deficiency is associated with fatal strokes among white patients, but it's not tied to more stroke deaths among black people, researchers announced Sunday at the the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions in Chicago, Illinois.

Scientists from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine professed surprise at their findings, which were based on health records of nearly 8,000 black and white adults.

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Cutting teen salt could save future health costs
November 14th, 2010
10:31 AM ET

Cutting teen salt could save future health costs

Reducing the amount of salt teens eat by 3 grams per day – that's about 1,200 milligrams (of sodium) or a 1/2 teaspoon of salt – could lead to a 68 percent decrease in the number of teenagers with hypertension and also lower the number of U.S. adults with heart conditions in the future, says new research from epidemiologists at University of California, San Francisco. [Update: Some commenters expressed confusion about the 1,200 milligrams. This number is the amount of sodium in 3 grams of salt. The American Heart Association also answers questions about sodium on their website.]

Hypertension or high blood pressure can lead to strokes and heart attacks, and although these problems are not common in teens, studies have found that young adults in their 20s and 30s who have high blood pressure often began the struggle as children.

Dr. Kristin Bibbins-Domingo, lead author of the UCSF study, says the taste for salt is a learned behavior, and so early intervention is key. "We can hopefully change the expectation of how food should taste,  ideally to something slightly less salty," she says.

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Filed under: Heart • Nutrition

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Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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