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Study: Girls take more chances during first sex
November 8th, 2010
06:15 PM ET

Study: Girls take more chances during first sex

Even though teenage boys are known for their risky behavior, it’s girls who are more likely to engage in unprotected first sex, according to research presented Monday at an American Public Health Association meeting in Denver.

Nicole Weller, a doctoral student at Arizona State University, analyzed government data and found adolescent girls were 30 percent more likely than boys to have  sex without contraception during their first sexual encounter. Weller said that surprised her.

“It does because of the history of boys engaging in risky behavior across the spectrum and then seeing that females are having first unprotected sex is telling a different story,” Weller said. For example, teenage boys are more likely than girls to drink and smoke.

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November 8th, 2010
05:50 PM ET

Scientists convert skin to blood

Researchers at Canada's McMaster University report that they've figured out how to make blood out of human skin.

The breakthrough could eventually mean that patients needing blood for surgery, cancer treatment or treatment of blood conditions like anemia will be able to have blood created from a patch of their own skin to provide transfusions, the university said.

Skin cells that are removed from the patient can be multiplied in a petri dish and converted into a large quantity of blood cells, which themselves can be multiplied, lead researcher Mick Bhatia told CNN. FULL POST

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Filed under: Stem Cells

Two minutes to diagnose memory problems?
November 8th, 2010
04:28 PM ET

Two minutes to diagnose memory problems?

A screening test that takes just two minutes could detect as many as eight in ten cases of cognitive impairment, a condition that is often a precursor to Alzheimer’s, according to an article in the Archives of Internal Medicine. Current screening tests take a minimum of 10 to 15 minutes, and require the patient to write with pen and paper, an impossibility for many people who are hospitalized.

The new screening test is known as the “Sweet Sixteen,” because it involves 16 elements. There are eight questions on basic orientation, such as “where are you?” and “What day is it?” The person tested is also given three items to remember, asked to count a number sequence forwards and backwards and asked again about the three items.

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Study: Heart attack deaths unchanged despite quicker treatment
November 8th, 2010
04:25 PM ET

Study: Heart attack deaths unchanged despite quicker treatment

Efforts to improve the speed at which heart attack patients get life-saving treatment have worked, says a new study, but mortality rates have not changed.

Researchers at the University of Michigan looked at the medical records of more than 8,000 heart attack patients, and found that despite a marked decrease in "door-to-balloon time," patients are still dying at the same rate.

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Neanderthals less 'creative' than humans
November 8th, 2010
12:01 PM ET

Neanderthals less 'creative' than humans

We recently learned Ozzy Osbourne apparently has some genetic traces of Neanderthal in him, and now scientists are finding out even more about this extinct human relative.

The modern human brain and the Neanderthal brain began at about the same size at birth, but their skulls show that they began developing very differently within the first year of life, scientists say.

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November 8th, 2010
10:04 AM ET

Why do I hear whistling in both of my ears?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Mondays, it's pediatrician Dr. Jennifer Shu.

Question asked by Chris of Tewksbury, New Jersey:

I am a 62-year-old male. For over a year now I have been having a whistling in both of my ears. It goes on 24/7 and I am at the end of my rope. Please help me. FULL POST


November 8th, 2010
12:01 AM ET

Sleep same for nursing, formula moms

Breast milk or formula?  New moms are often told if you want your baby to sleep through the night, give her formula.  Why? Many moms swear since it's thicker than breast milk, it fills little tummies up and not only helps baby sleep better, but also helps Mom get more deep sleep.  But is that true?  It's a question that's debated around kitchen tables and on mommy blogs. Now a new study finds breastfeeding moms and moms who feed their babies formula, get the same amount of sleep.

West Virginia University researchers asked 80 new moms of babies 2 weeks to 3 months old to keep sleep diaries.  They also wore watch-like devices that measured nighttime sleep.  At the end of  the study, researchers found no difference in total sleep time or sleep quality between mothers who were exclusively breastfeeding, exclusively formula feeding or using a combination of the two.  They also found there were no differences in daytime sleepiness or fatigue.  The results are published in this week's  journal Pediatrics.

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Post-mastectomy, women prefer silicone implants
November 8th, 2010
12:01 AM ET

Post-mastectomy, women prefer silicone implants

Women who choose silicone implants after a mastectomy tend to be more satisfied with their breasts than women who get saline-filled implants, according to a new study.

Like women who get cosmetic implants, those who get silicone implants as part of breast reconstruction tend to be happier with the look and feel of the breast.

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Study: Fast food marketing up, food still unhealthy
November 8th, 2010
12:01 AM ET

Study: Fast food marketing up, food still unhealthy

Fast food marketing to children is on the rise, according to a new study, and the foods that popular restaurant chains are advertising are extremely unhealthy.

The report, released Monday by Yale University's Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, looked at 12 popular restaurant chains, and out of more than 3,000 kids meal combinations, found only 12 that met the nutritional guidelines for preschool-aged kids.

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Topical rub eases kids' cold symptoms, study says
November 8th, 2010
12:01 AM ET

Topical rub eases kids' cold symptoms, study says

Although Vicks VapoRub is often used to fight colds and congestion, there has never been proof of how well it works. Now, new research reported in the journal Pediatrics finds, the combination of camphor, menthol and eucalyptus oils actually does ease cold symptoms and help children suffering from upper-respiratory infections sleep.

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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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