home
RSS
November 5th, 2010
03:44 PM ET

Body clock disrupted by 'falling back'? Stay in bed

Daylight saving time ends this weekend. At 2 a.m. Sunday, the clock falls back one hour. While most of us plan to embrace that blessed hour (by sleeping right through it), the time change can throw a few people for a loop.

“They won’t be sleep-deprived, but it’ll hurt their ability to shift their body clock,” said Dr. Alfred Lewy, a professor of psychiatry at the Oregon Health and Science University.

FULL POST


New clues found to symptom-free HIV
November 5th, 2010
02:38 PM ET

New clues found to symptom-free HIV

There's still no vaccine for HIV, but researchers have made inroads in discovering new clues to why a minority of infected people can carry the virus without symptoms.

Only about one in 300 people infected appear to have an immune system that can naturally suppress the virus's replication, and thus they carry low levels of the virus, the study said. Specific genetic variations may be responsible for this uncommon response to HIV, this study published in the journal Science found.

FULL POST


November 5th, 2010
01:11 PM ET

Fitness digest: Chilean miner signs up for marathon, barefooters to run thru NY

Making us feel woefully inadequate this week is Chilean miner, Edison Pena, 34.  The guy popped out almost 70 days underground and decided to run in the New York City marathon Sunday.

Joining New York, Philadelphia and Seattle are among several cities hosting  treks this month. Here is the marathon version of the fitness digest.

FULL POST


November 5th, 2010
11:02 AM ET

Human Factor: A young soprano, hope and reality

My parents had a penchant for giving their kids unusual names. Zenith Wisdom, the last of 11 living siblings, was no exception. My medical drama demanded unselfishness from our big family. I hoped Zen would be spared. But when I landed in the hospital, mom would come, leaving Zen behind. Others were there who loved him, but I spent nights, thinking and worrying about his past, present and future.

I grew up with two adoring parents, lots of brothers and sisters to play with and a caring community that took an active interest in my future. Home was happy and crazy. When Zen was 6, I was diagnosed with pulmonary hypertension. Our dad died suddenly when Zen was 11. As our family’s magical world became more complicated, Zen’s craziness was markedly less jubilant.

FULL POST


Filed under: Mind and body • Women's Health

November 5th, 2010
10:54 AM ET

After son's concussion, a mother worries

It seems everytime an NFL or college football player is knocked out from a hard blow, it reignites the debate over how to protect athletes from concussions.   This week, the American Academy of Neurology released its updated guidelines to help make diagnosing concussions at sporting events easier. This month, Sports Illustrated devoted a special issue to addressing the impact of concussions on football, its players and its fans.  And CNN has done numerous reports on how teen brains are particularly at risk from concussions on the football field.

But what about the parents of those kids who must choose between supporting their child's passion and talent for the sport, and protecting him or her from the unknown?

Recently, CNN's Sarah Hoye spent time with a family in Sicklerville, New Jersey, whose son suffered a concussion last year at the high school state championship game.   Today, Calvin Lowe - pictured above - still plays football, as his parents cheer him on from the sidelines.  But his mother still struggles with the decision to let him return to football. "If I had my way, of course he'd be playing a much safer sport," she said.


Filed under: Brain • Traumatic brain injury

Advertisement
About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

Advertisement
Advertisement