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November 4th, 2010
05:41 PM ET

TEDMED: Gupta on helping Haiti

CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta couldn't make it to the TEDMED 2010 conference because he was on assignment in Haiti, but he still presented his perspective on covering the earthquake and cholera outbreak there.

In January, in the aftermath of the earthquake, Gupta remembers children running after dump trucks to see if the bodies of their parents or loved ones were inside. "It was as if these people just vanished off the face of the Earth," he said. Some say it will take four years to get Haiti back to the way it was one day before the earthquake, he said.

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Study: U.S. obesity rate will hit 42 percent
November 4th, 2010
05:00 PM ET

Study: U.S. obesity rate will hit 42 percent

Just over one-third of American adults are obese. Though alarmingly high, this rate has remained relatively steady over the past decade, leading some public health experts to suggest that the obesity epidemic has peaked.

Now, researchers at Harvard University are predicting that the worst is yet to come. If current trends continue, they say, the obesity rate in the U.S. won't level off until it reaches at least 42 percent, circa 2050.

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Filed under: Obesity

November 4th, 2010
04:36 PM ET

U.S. to update low-income nutrition program

A federally funded food program that provides meals to more than 3.3 million adults and children from low-income families mainly through after-school programs, emergency shelters and child and adult day care centers, may soon undergo major revisions for the first time in more than two decades.

 At the request of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Institute of Medicine reviewed the 42-year old Child and Adult Care Food Program and issued a series of recommendations to help "bring the meal requirements into alignment with the best available dietary guidance" and be more consistent with other programs of the Food and Nutrition Service.

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Does a clean kitchen lead to more sex? The art of 'chore-play'
November 4th, 2010
03:59 PM ET

Does a clean kitchen lead to more sex? The art of 'chore-play'

Want to get lucky tonight, Guys? Then perhaps you should reach for a bottle of Windex before you reach for her body. No, I’m not suggesting anything kinky. In fact, the concept of “choreplay”—that women are more likely to want to have sex when their male partner helps out around the house—is a hot topic in research circles:

  • One recent study from the University of Western Ontario, for example, found that wives are happier when their husbands pitch in with housework.
  • Another report from researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago even suggests men who help clean, take care of their kids, and do other domestic chores may see the benefits of their labor pay off in the bedroom.

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Zapping a brain for math's sake, and other news
November 4th, 2010
03:40 PM ET

Zapping a brain for math's sake, and other news

This week, as we've watched news and trends on brain matters, we've seen some fascinating studies and perspectives about enhancing the mind and understanding diseases of the brain. Here's a sampling:

A head for numbers
Don't try this at home, but researchers at the University of Oxford say applying an electrical current to the head can improve mathematical ability, depending on the direction of the current, the BBC reports. The study involved only 15 people, though, and more research needs to be done before it becomes a standard practice for people who aren't good with numbers.

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Who's sicker: Older Americans or English?
November 4th, 2010
03:19 PM ET

Who's sicker: Older Americans or English?

If you're 65 or older, you're more likely to be healthier in England than in America. The catch: in the United States, you're more likely to live longer, a new study finds.

Chronic diseases are more common in Americans than English aged 55 to 64, a study in the journal Demography found, and in this age group American and English have about the same death rate. At the same time, Americans 65 and older don't die as fast as the same age group in England, the study authors found.

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November 4th, 2010
01:17 PM ET

CT scans cut lung cancer deaths for first time

Lung cancer screening by CT, or computed tomography, can reduce lung cancer deaths by detecting the disease at early stages, a new study from the National Cancer Institute says. It was the first time researchers saw a reduction in death as a result of lung screening, experts said.

In the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), more than 53,000 current and past heavy smokers between the ages of 55 and 74 were screened for lung cancer by either low-dose CT scan or standard chest X-ray. Researchers found 20 percent fewer deaths in those screened by CT scan. The data were so statistically convincing the trial was stopped and the results released.

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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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