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Do violent movies, games make teens aggressive?
October 18th, 2010
07:15 PM ET

Do violent movies, games make teens aggressive?

Watching violence portrayed in movies and other media may make teens more accepting of violence, researchers report in the journal Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience.

Previous research has shown a connection between violent media and aggression, as well as violence and desensitization. But this study looks at how teenagers' brains specifically respond to violent media, said Jordan Grafman, senior investigator at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

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October 18th, 2010
06:19 PM ET

FDA clears egg company to resume shipping

The FDA has sent Hillandale Farms of Hampton, Iowa, a releasing letter allowing the company to start shipping its eggs, beginning Monday.

Hillandale Farms was one of two companies that recalled its eggs in August 2010 because of the potential for Salmonella poisoning. According to the FDA, since August, three egg-producing houses owned by Hillandale have been extensively tested and have been found to have no evidence of Salmonella contamination. Four others overseen by the company still are undergoing further testing before they are allowed to ship. Hillandale has also promised to enhance its systems in order to detect Salmonella in the future.

In the letter to Hillandale, the FDA noted, "(We) find your corrective actions to be adequate. We note your agreement to clean and disinfect houses one (1) and two (2) prior to repopulating and your commitment to comply with the requirements of the Egg Safety Rule."

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October 18th, 2010
06:14 PM ET

Study shows peer support benefits diabetes patients

Peer-support improves blood sugar control in patients with diabetes, according to a study published Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Findings confirmed phone calls to peers facing similar disease-management issues offered an alternative and rather beneficial approach to traditional nurse-care for patients with diabetes.

Traditional nurse-care management programs are not useful for all patients with diabetes. Lack of face-to-face meeting time and financial barriers set hurdles in creating quality management programs. One of the costliest diseases, diabetes is an expensive disease to treat. Even more so, the cost of taking a pill to control blood sugar levels is on the rise.

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October 18th, 2010
02:50 PM ET

Bone density tests shouldn't be one-size-fits-all, study says

The frequency of postmenopausal women getting tested for osteoporosis should depend on the individuals’ bone health, rather than following a one-size-fits-all approach, according to a study presented this week.

Although the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force estimated that every two years might be a reasonable interval, there is no long-term study to show how often women should be screened for osteoporosis.

One study out of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine suggests that having a bone density exam should range every one to 10 years depending on the woman’s health.

Take a healthy-bones test

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Meditation reduces stress, instills compassion
October 18th, 2010
12:36 PM ET

Meditation reduces stress, instills compassion

A meditation practice invented more than 1,000 years ago may have real health benefits for people today, researchers at Emory University say.

These scientists are looking at how an ancient Tibetan Buddhist meditation practice called Lojong may help reduce stress itself, as well as improve the immune system's response to stress, said Dr. Charles Raison, principal investigator of the study at Emory and CNNHealth mental health expert.

Raison planned to present preliminary results of the study to the Dalai Lama, who attended the Compassion Meditation Conference on Monday. The project is called the Compassion and Attention Longitudinal Meditation Study (CALM).

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Breast cancer: 'Grief, hope, desperation, fury, resignation, camaraderie and … love'
October 18th, 2010
10:30 AM ET

Breast cancer: 'Grief, hope, desperation, fury, resignation, camaraderie and … love'

Last week, freelance writer Amanda Enayati  shared the lessons of her breast cancer journey in a series of five essays on CNNHealth.com.  In turn, readers shared their own stories of strength and survival.  Today Amanda reflects on her resulting tumble of emotions and gratitude.


“I just learned 2 weeks ago that I have breast Cancer, I had a lumpectomy 2 days ago. I also never thought this would happen, 48 y/o, my God I was upset, I said to God I have already gone through so much, I have a 24 y/o with Downs and my life has been a struggle, but something inside me knew, that I had to go through this chapter in my life.”

This is how far I got into the woman’s comment about my first essay before I broke down weeping.

I had not expected the weeping. Or the joyful tears. I had been naïve.

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Filed under: Breast Cancer

October 18th, 2010
09:39 AM ET

What can I do to prevent kidney stones?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Monday, it's Dr. Jennifer Shu, a pediatrician.

Question asked by Roger of Maryland

Several years ago I had kidney stones. I would like to know how or what I can do to prevent this happening again. I understand that there is a chance of this happening again once you have it before.

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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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