home
RSS
October 5th, 2010
05:43 PM ET

Laptops toast and discolor skin

Warm laptops could leave behind unsightly skin spots for some users.

Take the case reported in this week’s journal of Pediatrics concerning a 12-year-old boy who had lesions on his left upper leg.

FULL POST


October 5th, 2010
05:40 PM ET

Binge drinking common in teens and adults

More than one in four high school students and adults aged 18 to 34 years had at least one episode of binge drinking a month, according to a new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Specifically, 2 out of 3 high school students and almost 1 in 3 adults who drink alcohol also binge drink, the CDC said.  Binge drinking is a serious health problem no matter how often people engage in the practice according to Dr.Robert Brewer, study author and alcohol prevention expert at the CDC. "Binge drinking at any level is associated with increase harm to health– similar to smoking– any is undesirable," he said.

FULL POST


October 5th, 2010
10:05 AM ET

Priorities may drive happiness

Most of us have thought, 'If only I could win the lottery, then I'd be happy forever.' But according to one of the first studies to look at long-term happiness, major life events, like a sudden cash windfall, are not what make us happy, rather, it's the priorities we set in life.

"The main thing that's surprising about these results is that it challenges this whole field," said lead author Melbourne University sociologist Bruce Headey. "This study goes against the prevailing wisdom that happiness is fixed." The study was published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

FULL POST


October 5th, 2010
08:48 AM ET

Could mom's gastric bypass surgery put babies at risk?

More American teens are getting gastric bypass surgery.  A small, but provocative study presented this week at the national conference of the American Academy of Pediatrics suggests there may be a link between gastric bypass surgery in teen girls and an increased risk of neural tube defects in their babies.

Dr. Diana Farmer, surgeon-in-chief at Benioff Children's Hospital in San Francisco, and her team started connecting the dots after a teen mother came to the hospital's fetal treatment center.  The fetus had spina bifida, a condition where a portion of the neural tube fails to develop or close properly.  The mother had recently undergone gastric bypass surgery.  Intrigued, Farmer did some research and found six additional cases of babies born with neural tube defects in mothers who recently had gastric bypass surgery.

FULL POST


October 5th, 2010
08:35 AM ET

Can antidepressants raise liver enzymes?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Tuesdays, it's Dr. Charles Raison, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Emory University, and an expert in the mind-body connection for health.

Question asked by Ann, of Bloomfield, New York

How do I help my daughter who has a diagnosis of bipolar and each time the doctors put her on an antidepressant, her liver counts go up and she goes into mania? This happens when the liver levels rise. It takes at least two weeks to cycle through. FULL POST


October 5th, 2010
12:01 AM ET

Kids in the U.S. still aren't getting enough iron

Iron helps build strong muscles and is essential for healthy blood. And it's especially important for babies, because without iron the body can't make red blood cells and doesn't get the oxygen it needs to grow.

But according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, iron deficiency in children is a major problem. But parents often don't know because experts say the tests for iron deficiency aren't reliable. In a clinical report released at the National Conference & Exhibition of the American Academy of Pediatrics in San Francisco, the AAP renewed guidelines to increase iron intake in infants and children, and to improve screening methods.

FULL POST


Advertisement
About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

Advertisement
Advertisement