home
RSS
ADHD is a genetic condition, study says
September 29th, 2010
06:30 PM ET

ADHD is a genetic condition, study says

A new study in the Lancet provides the first direct evidence that genetic abnormalities are responsible for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, ADHD.

Although previous research had shown that ADHD can be inherited, no specific genes have been identified before that seem to underlie this condition. But that doesn't mean that someone with these particular genetic markers will have ADHD, experts say.

FULL POST


September 29th, 2010
05:50 PM ET

Childhood cancer treatment sparks talk of a "cure"

It’s not often we use the word “cure” in a headline about cancer, but there’s news today that has some doctors buzzing. 

A report published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine describes a new therapy for a deadly childhood cancer.  The disease is called high-risk neuroblastoma, which affects the nerves lining the spinal cord and often forms tumors around the adrenal gland, in the abdomen.  226 patients were split into two equal groups.  In the half receiving the experimental therapy, 66 percent survived without complications for two years, compared to 46 percent of those who got standard therapy.

The difference was so dramatic that the study was actually stopped early, because researchers decided it would be unethical not to offer the new therapy to all patients.

FULL POST


Allergy bullies in school: Your thoughts
September 29th, 2010
04:54 PM ET

Allergy bullies in school: Your thoughts

CNN received a huge response yesterday to the article about kids being bullied for their food allergies.

And more than 70,000 readers responded to a poll on Eatocracy about whether they think schools should make special accommodations for kids with peanut allergies.

FULL POST


September 29th, 2010
04:54 PM ET

Michael J. Fox on Parkinson's and life

By Dr. Sanjay Gupta
CNN Chief Medical Correspondent

When I went to Michael J. Fox’s neighborhood this morning, I had no idea what time we would start our interview. “He has to time his medications,” I was told. “When his medications kick in, he will be ready.” As far as I could tell, Fox’s medications kicked in right away, and for the next 90 minutes, we talked about everything.

Fox spoke about the hard shoes he has to wear first thing in the morning, because his feet and legs are so stiff. He humorously added that he just puts his toothbrush in his mouth, and lets the movement of his head do the rest of the work. As a neurosurgeon, it was fascinating to hear Michael describe his own brain surgery with such great clarity and his fears about doing it again. “Well, it is brain surgery…"  he said with flourish.

There is a lot we don’t know about Parkinson’s disease. For starters, no one is sure what causes it. One’s genetics likely loads the gun, and something in the environment pulls the trigger. But what? It might surprise you to know four people on the set of Fox’s first television series, "Leo and Me," developed early onset Parkinson’s disease. A statistical anomaly, or a clue? Michael, and his foundation’s scientists aren’t sure. Michael pauses when I ask him about it, he shrugs his shoulders and says, “I am not as concerned about a few people. I am focused on everyone who has the disease.”

FULL POST


September 29th, 2010
03:39 PM ET

Parents urged to halt use of infant 'sleep positioners'

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration along with the Consumer Product Safety Commission on Wednesday warned parents to stop using infant sleep positioners. According to authorities, the devices, which were originally designed to help stabilize a baby to avoid acid reflux or "flat head syndrome," are being used by parents to protect their infants from SIDS.

The federal agencies revealed that over the past 13 years, CPSC and the FDA have received 12 reports of babies between the ages of one and four months of age, who became trapped and suffocated between a sleep positioner and the side of a crib or bassinet.

FULL POST


September 29th, 2010
08:31 AM ET

Should I get a mammogram?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Wednesdays, it's Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical officer at the
American Cancer Society.

Question asked via e-mail:

Is it really worth it to get a mammogram? Should I be getting mammograms?

FULL POST


Advertisement
About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

Advertisement
Advertisement