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September 28th, 2010
04:43 PM ET

Intensive lifestyle changes improve diabetes risk factors

More exercise and a better, healthier diet can lower type 2 diabetes symptoms according to a new study published in Archives of Internal Medicine Monday.

Researchers looked at more than 5,000 patients between the ages of 55 and 76 who were overweight or obese and had type 2 diabetes. All the participants were given information about diabetes.  Half of the patients were also coached about their exercise program, their weight, their fitness level as well as their blood pressure and blood sugar levels.  This group was encouraged to limit daily food consumption to 1,200 to 1,800 calories and to gradually increase the amount of moderate exercise (like brisk walking) to 175 minutes per week .

Those who received the additional support and coaching "achieved a weight loss of 6.15 percent of their body weight, which is roughly 13 pounds  [on average over four years]," says lead study author Dr. Rena Wing.  The control group only "lost about 1  percent of their body weight, about 2 pounds," Wing adds.

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Filed under: Diabetes • Heart

Clue found in aggressive breast cancer
September 28th, 2010
03:55 PM ET

Clue found in aggressive breast cancer

Researchers may have found a new lead toward  treating triple negative breast cancer, a rare and aggressive form of the breast cancer that occurs more often in younger women and African-American or Hispanic women.

A study looks at insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R), which has been shown to be involved in several cancers, including more common types of breast cancer. But no study has focused on its role in triple negative breast cancer before. The findings were presented at the Fourth AACR International Conference on Molecular Diagnostics in Cancer Therapeutic Development on Tuesday.

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September 28th, 2010
01:42 PM ET

Celiac disease cases doubled every 15 years in study group

The rate of celiac disease is growing and the onset of gluten intolerance can occur in older people, a study in the Annals of Medicine found.

Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder, triggered by eating the protein gluten, which is found in bread, pasta, cookies, pizza crust and many other foods containing wheat, barley or rye.  People with celiac disease cannot tolerate foods containing gluten and can experience an immune reaction in their small intestines, causing damage and other complications.

Researchers from the Center for Celiac Research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and their colleagues found that the incidence of celiac disease has doubled every 15 years since 1974 in a population sample.

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September 28th, 2010
06:00 AM ET

Empowered Patient: How to choose the right hospital

Chuck Toeniskoetter says he's alive today because of a nurse and a paramedic who made sure he went  to the right hospital when he suffered a stroke on a California mountaintop.   The lesson Toeniskoetter learned can make everyone a more empowered patient.

Toeniskoetter had just finished a morning of skiing on Bear Valley Mountain when he suffered a massive stroke.  The helicopter pilot wanted to take him to the closest hospital, so not to waste precious minutes.  The nurse and paramedic fought to take the patient to a hospital 15 minutes further away – Sutter Roseville Medical Center in Roseville, California – where he was much more likely to receive a drug that could reverse the effects of the stroke.

"They stood on the runners of the helicopter and were relentless with the pilot," Toeniskoetter remembers. "They saved my life." FULL POST


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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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