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September 22nd, 2010
06:17 PM ET

Hope for heart patients with minimally invasive surgery

A new heart procedure could save thousands of people each year who are too sick or frail to undergo major surgery, according to a report in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The procedure is used to treat aortic stenosis, a narrowing of the valve between the heart and the artery that carries blood to the rest of the body.  The narrow opening forces the heart to work harder than normal, which can lead to fatigue, weakness and heart failure.  According to Dr. Martin Leon of New York Presbyterian-Columbia Hospital, the study’s lead author, the condition afflicts about 5 percent of all people over the age of 75.

FULL POST


September 22nd, 2010
03:31 PM ET

Can caffeine cause intoxication?

“Can too much caffeine make you insane – and mentally unstable enough to unknowingly kill someone?” This Just In blogger Mallory Simon of CNN.com, posed the question in her post about a buzzworthy murder defense.

A man’s defense attorneys are expected to make the claim that too much soda, caffeine-laced diet pills and the energy drink No Fear combined with sleep deprivation, resulted in a “temporary psychotic disorder" and so, the defendant Woody Will Smith couldn't be criminally responsible for the murder of his wife.

Amanda Hornsby-Smith was strangled with an extension cord in 2009. FULL POST


September 22nd, 2010
12:38 PM ET

Company in egg recall had been warned

A company under fire after a salmonella outbreak that sickened more than 1,600 people has had "warning after warning" about conditions at its farms for decades, the chairman of a congressional committee probing the outbreak said Wednesday.

Watch the House commerce subcommittee hearing live here.

Need a refresher on the egg recall situation? Here are the basics of what happened.

And here's a roundup of egg safety coverage from Eatocracy.


Filed under: Food Safety

How your health care may change
September 22nd, 2010
09:54 AM ET

How your health care may change

Six months ago tomorrow, President Barack Obama signed landmark health care reform legislation. On Thursday, a wave of major changes will take effect. But how will that change your health insurance? Here are eight ways ...

1. If you are an adult under age 26, you will now be covered by your parent or guardian's employer-based health insurance. In some states, this coverage extends until age 28 or 29, CNNMoney reports. Some companies began covering these older dependents as early as May; the Department of Health and Human Services offers more information.

FULL POST


September 22nd, 2010
09:19 AM ET

FDA approves first MS treatment in pill form

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the first oral drug for treating relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), the most common form of the disease.

Unlike current MS drugs, which are given by injections or infusion, this new drug, called Gilenya or fingolimod, comes in a capsule which is taken once a day.  Taking a pill is much less painful than having to stick a needle in your body on a daily, weekly or monthly basis, which is what many MS patients have to do now.   

FULL POST


September 22nd, 2010
08:44 AM ET

TEDMED: What do your genes say about you?

Do you know what your genetic ancestry is? Do you know what diseases you're at risk for?

In her TEDMED talk, Anne Wojcicki of 23andMe talks about why you might want to consider genetic testing through a service such as hers. Your genes can tell you about appropriate dosing for drugs such as Warfarin, used for blood clots, and Plavix (clopidogrel), which is for preventing future strokes and heart attacks.

Genetic testing can also reveal your risks for specific diseases, she says. That may sound scary, but Wojcicki argues that it can make people have healthier habits. Her husband, Google co-founder Sergey Brin, began exercising more and watching what he eats after learning about his risk for Parkinson's, she says. FULL POST


September 22nd, 2010
08:35 AM ET

Is the inability of cancer patients to eat a concern?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Wednesdays, it's Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical officer at the American Cancer Society.

Question asked by Steve Snodgrass, Bowling Green, Kentucky

I wanted to see what your experts thought about cancer/chemotherapy patients and protein malnutrition. I have read it leads to as many as 45 to 50 percent of cancer deaths. Is the inability of cancer patients to eat of major concern to cancer health care providers? Thank you. FULL POST


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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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