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September 21st, 2010
10:23 AM ET

How can I stop using Paxil without the side effects?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Tuesdays, it's Dr. Charles Raison, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Emory University, and an expert in the mind-body connection for health.

Question asked by Sharon Reynolds of Tampa, Florida: I have been taking 10 mg of Paxil for nine years. I would like to get off of it but have heard of the many side effects associated with stopping it. Brain "buzzes" and various other frightening possibilities.

How can I stop Paxil without those side effects? I started taking it after a complete hysterectomy that resulted in extreme anxiety.

Expert answer: Dear Sharon,

There is good news and bad news about your situation.

The good news is that only about 20 percent of patients who take antidepressants experience these type of withdrawal symptoms when they discontinue the medications, and when experienced, these symptoms are usually mild and resolve in a week or two.

The bad news is that you have two risk factors for experiencing an antidepressant withdrawal syndrome. First you have been on your antidepressant for an extended period. Second, you are taking Paxil (generic paroxetine) which - because of its short "half-life" in the body - is especially notorious for causing withdrawal problems.

There are two very important things you can do to reduce your risk of having the type of symptoms you describe.

First, you should work closely with your health care provider. Second, you should never just stop the medication.

Probably the all-time best way to experience antidepressant withdrawal is to just suddenly stop the medication. Doing this is a shock to the nervous system, which has adjusted its neurotransmitter release based on the presence of the antidepressant.

In the case of medications like Paxil that affect serotonin, we believe most of the withdrawal symptoms are related to a sudden increase in serotonin activity for which body and brain are not prepared.

The first thing a good clinician will do is closely examine whether stopping the Paxil is a good idea in the first place. If you have been on the medication for 10 years and are emotionally stable, it might be the right thing to do.

Even if it makes sense to do this, a good clinician will be carefully watching, not just for withdrawal symptoms, but also for any sign that the psychiatric condition that prompted you to take the medication in the first place isn't coming back.

The most common symptoms of a Paxil withdrawal syndrome are feeling like you have the flu, often in combination with dizziness, sensory disturbances (like the buzzing you describe) and anxiety/agitation.

The trick to lowering your chances of having these symptoms is to reduce the dose of the antidepressant as slowly as possible. For people who are really sensitive it can take months to get off an antidepressant slowly enough to avoid withdrawal symptoms.

But remember that most people can stop an antidepressant cold and won't have symptoms. Whether you would be similarly fortunate or more unlucky is probably not a question you should test out. Rather, I recommend starting to work with your clinician to slowly lower the dose. If you feel fine you might try lowering the dose more rapidly as it feels comfortable.


soundoff (113 Responses)
  1. Scott

    I took Paxil for about 4 years. When it was time to stop, I gradually decreased the dosage over a period of about 6 weeks. This was done in consultation with a psychiatric physician. I experienced occasional mild dizziness, but nothing debilitating.

    September 21, 2010 at 21:56 | Report abuse | Reply
  2. vik

    I had trouble going odd effexor that sound like the paxil head buzzes so many have mentioned. My brother in law, a psychiatrist, wrote the manufacturer and got two interesting replies two days apart. "Yes" they said, "we've gotten usolicitated feedback from consumers reporting this phenomenon." They suggested going on prozac short term and weaning off the effexor, since prozac has a longer half life. It worked well, was off the effexor in no time and had no trouble getting off the prozac.

    September 21, 2010 at 22:07 | Report abuse | Reply
  3. Mike

    I've been taking Paxil. and I don't understand these side effects everyone else seems to be experiencing. Maybe I'm taking the wrong antidepressant.

    September 21, 2010 at 22:30 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Fatima

      to turn the other cheek). What I did really hepeld me, and nowadays, most people cannot tell that I am shy. Well, nobody can tell. I really think that social anxiety is a PHOBIA and you can treat it like any other phobia, you have to confront your fear.So. . .in junior high, I signed up for theater productions. In senior high, I signed up for debate and speech teams, and model united nations and (i think it's called?) student congress. That was kinda cool, I got to sit at a desk in the house of representatives in the state capitol. So then I could fake that I was confident pretty good, even though I was terrified the whole time and never could sleep the night before an event. I used to write watch your pitch and talk slowly on my notes, so I wouldn't get all squeaky with terror, and my lack of sleep often hepeld, because I would be too tired to get quite so anxious.As a young adult, I lectored in my large Catholic church. I forced myself to do that, because at that point, I was already pretty good at talking. I became a board member of a medium sized club, then president (and you had to get up in front of a lot of people for that, too, about 40, sometimes more). Then I went to graduate school and was a teaching assistant and was on the graduate student council. More talking in front of others. Had to push myself the whole time. I had to force myself to do these things, because I was so shy, but on the other hand, I was pretty good at it, so my help was needed, so I had an altruistic reason to pursue these goals, too. I mean, it is really a phobia, but I confronted it like a snake phobia, just oversaturated myself with terrifying experiences, quit avoiding it. My self-esteem is still terrible, sometimes, because I have really bad bipolar depressions, often, and it is humiliating to be mentally ill and not be able to hold down a job. But I just got up in a county board meeting in front of 40 people and asked the county commissioners some questions, so even though I'm crazy (not really, just depressed) I still project self-confidence. And, as always, I was terrified. ****But nobody could tell.*** I fake it really good. And because I have gotten sorta used to speaking up in groups, (always working on that fear) one on one introductions really are no sweat nowadays. Small groups are still a problem, I'm awfully quiet, but if people ask me why I'm so quiet, I don't get as anxious as I used to. HINT HINT HINT what I do is ask people questions about things they are interested in, then they'll go on and on and on, and all you have to do is LOOK interested and go uh huh once in awhile. Try and remember one or two things they said so you can bring it up later (hard to remember when you are so afraid). I often have a notepad with me, in my purse, so I'll jot down their name as soon as I can. And if I have to be obvious about it, I laugh and say I have a terrible memory and don't want to forget their name. They are flattered, if anything. I still feel dumb, but they don't know it.So, practice, practice, practice. If you are out of school, try toastmasters, I know they hepeld my dad 30 years ago, maybe they are still a good group. It will take terrible motivation on your part to confront this, but as long as you avoid it, you will have the phobia. I am sure you will never be confident dealing with others, after all the above, I am still very shy and I always have to kick myself to talk to others. I have to remind myself to do some small talk, I'm always struggling with that. Also, you do kind of get over yourself as you age. You don't care much what others think. If they're saying mean stuff about you, well they have issues or something. So maybe things will get better all on their own, to some extent. I'm a lot more comfortable in my skin at age 42 than I was in my early 30 s. A LOT. I think it did help me that I confronted this fear when I was a kid, I'm glad that I did that, in fact. I'm sure you're thinking my social anxiety isn't as bad as yours, maybe not, but it is very bad, and used to be a lot worse. The key is fake it until you make it.Good luck!! With hard work, you WILL do WELL! And maybe be a little less scared in the process. I don't think there is any easy way.

      April 14, 2012 at 13:03 | Report abuse |
    • terri houck

      I loved Paxil as far as keeping me sane and with the social anxiety, but it ruined my libido and I gained 40 lbs. just because I didn't care about anything. So, I tried and tried to go off Paxil and it was a nightmare. Then I started taking 10 mg instead of 20mg. I had the side effects but found Oxytocin, a mood enhancer. It has saved my life!!! I'm not going to try to go completely off the Paxil until I retire in 32 days, but I'll have the oxytocin on hand to help. (I heard about oxytocin on the Dr. Oz Show! Thank you God!)

      August 24, 2012 at 23:34 | Report abuse |
  4. Jane

    I tried Zoloft and a couple of other antidepressants but they didn't do anything but 'numb' me to any emotion whatsoever (good or bad). I tapered off and have since found I had a B12 deficiency that was causing my problem. I feel 100% better; anyone considering these drugs should have their vitamin levels checked just in case.

    September 21, 2010 at 23:43 | Report abuse | Reply
  5. Ken

    My cold-turkey stoppage of Paxil was disastrous. Following a heart attack my PCP got the names of two medications mixed up – Paxil and Plavix. Not wanting me to be taking two doses of Plavix (he thought I had already been taking it, but in fact I had been taking Paxil, not Plavix) he told me to "stop the Paxil". I complied and a week later landed in jail. I don't remember the details of the even that got me arrested, nor do I remember going there, but I do remember being arrested – that's not an easy thing to forget. This is practically ruined my life. I could not sue the doctor for malpractice because not only did he get confused, which he admitted to me over the phone, but he never wrote it down either. I am afraid to go back on Paxil because of that event.

    September 22, 2010 at 01:37 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Patrick

      I have also been having severe problems while transitioning from Paxil to Elavil. Two days ago I assaulted someone and only clearly remember parts of the incident. Thankfully, because I've been living in this town for 10+ years and have no prior arrests, the police released me with a court date. I will likely be struggling with self-hate, which is always one of my driving problems, for years to come. I have been under psychiatric care during this transition and have been receiving depression treatment since the mid-80s. Even with help I "popped". Depression and anxiety are no joke, treat them with care and professional supervision.

      August 18, 2013 at 10:57 | Report abuse |
  6. giofrey

    visit http://www.theroadback.org/
    This helped me get off celexa, which I had switched to fromPaxil. I'll never take any of that crap again. big mistake; but it can be remedied

    September 22, 2010 at 07:21 | Report abuse | Reply
  7. Julie

    I used this guys plan to get off Cymbalta. The supplements were easily obtainable at my local health food store, and the cost was very reasonable (less than $30). The Omega-3s were lifesavers...if I didn't take them, the "buzzing" became unbearable. AND his entire book is online...you don't have to buy ANYTHING to follow his plan–he simply wants to get people off these meds safely and humanely.
    http://www.theroadback.org/trbprogram.aspx

    September 22, 2010 at 08:28 | Report abuse | Reply
  8. Julie

    I took Paxil for many years and tried several times to step down my dosage very very slowly to wean myself off of it, but I still had the vertigo, buzzing, etc. and it was TERRIBLE. I ended up stopping cold turkey because I was pregnant. The withdrawl was bad, but at least it was like "pulling off the band aid quickly". I would never ever ever recommend Paxil to anyone and I would never take it again myself.

    September 22, 2010 at 08:34 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Judy Campbell

      I am a 44year old femaile and afte being on Paxil fir 3 years I knoew the time to go off of tem had come. Throght my own poor judgement I stopped ld turkey. I've been doing alot of research and it seems what I'm doing, feeling and thinking are all normal. t's been 7-10 dasys now. I was just hoping your could sare with me some of what you experienced. You equated it with pulling off a band-aid.....I think it sow similiartys as to when I stop breasfeeding my kids. I coulhave weined, and warm shower t death, but what do i do???bind myself really tight and make te best ofthenext week or more.

      November 9, 2012 at 11:39 | Report abuse |
  9. Jamie

    My husband has been on Paxil for at least 8 years, he is a corrections officer, and I believe that paxil has saved our marriage. I fill his med box each week for him and last month i forgot to put the Paxil in. By the third day he was calling me on the phone just raging about "much ado about nothing", and he could not control his temper. This behavior was very unordinary for him. When I got home from work I immediatley checked his med box...sure enough that's when I realized that I forgot his Paxil. It's scary for me to think about him NOT taking this drug....so it has been beneficial for us.

    September 22, 2010 at 09:22 | Report abuse | Reply
  10. Sadiegirl

    I guess I'm a little confused reading this string. People are saying how horrible Paxil is and they would never go on it again. For those of us who are taking Paxil and it's doing its job (as Jamie just wrote and I wrote above) why would I consider going off it? Yes, I do know about the withdrawal side effects that my Dr. and I discussed one time when I asked him if I should go off it since I've been on so long, but I never want to go back to the anxiety, mood swings, and panic attacks that I sufferered before I begain Paxil.

    September 22, 2010 at 11:21 | Report abuse | Reply
  11. LC

    I too though Paxil was the greatest thing since sliced bread and I'm not anti-med, for those who truly need them. But, there are plenty of us who don't want to rely on a pill for the rest of their lives and their subsequent side effects. Plenty of us who went on Paxil and other SSRIs for situational anxiety/depression and not a chronic issue.

    I took Paxil for 10 years for IBS. I tried to cold turkey once and tapered too quickly the second time. The ONLY way I was able to get off was to taper in 10% increments every 3 weeks. It was, hands down, one of the hardest things I've ever done. I'm well aware there are those who can quit cold turkey, or taper quickly, but I can also tel you there's no way I believe that only 20% of people taking SSRIs, suffer from withdrawal. Most of the time, w/d isn't acknowledged by doctors and the symptoms are blamed on "the original issue returning" or, "the original issue getting worse" and drugs start being added, upped, switched. If w/d was more widely recognized, people could avoid getting on the drug merry-go-round.

    And, for those of you saying you know about w/d and side effects and have discussed them with your doctor – that information was not known, or available, in 1997. It wasn't until a class action lawsuit and many Washington hearings, that w/d was forced to be acknowledged as well as the increased risks of suicide, especially in teens.

    September 22, 2010 at 13:28 | Report abuse | Reply
    • terri

      I agree with you totally. Doctors are not telling the truth about the withdrawal symtoms. So awful, awful, awful!!!

      August 24, 2012 at 23:38 | Report abuse |
    • Eric

      I totally agree this stuff is horrible. I am gonna start trying to get off it again but the side effects are horrible. 20% I think not more like 80% would be a better estimate. I think before a doctor prescribes Paxil he or she should be made to take it for a while and go off cold turkey. I will never take it again. Numb all the time and I gained 80lbs in a year thanks Doc. I'd rather be depressed.

      June 16, 2014 at 12:27 | Report abuse |
  12. InsideLookingOUT

    Prozac ,the first on this class ,was a few votes short of being pulled from the market in the early 90's.This class of medications i(serotonin reuptake inhibitors) is OVER-prescribed. We are playing with fire.Fire is great when it cooking a meal or keeping you warm but it can KILL you.I always thought(my opinion) this class of meds was "shotgun medicine" with no accurate lab measurements.Medicine can take a look at your blood and tell you if you need more potassium, sodium and even most medications. The measurement in the blood of prozac,serotonin or even its precursors 5-HTTP are not an accurate measure of your brain levels.A very small percent crosses the blood-brain barrier.The problem is this is in the brain and it is too much guess work.People have bad patches or blues in their lives.This class of meds has helped many people but does the benefit outweigh the risk?
    People are talking about half lives of the medication but they should be talking about the neurotransmitters in the brain like serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine.Some people just do not produce enough or it is broken down too quickly of these neurotransmitters to function normally.Your body is a series of biofeedback reactions and when you start to play with it your body may stop or decrease producing the chemicals. People who take any of these medications should really discuss it FACE to FACE with their health care provider and weigh out the benefits against the risks.Eat Healthy Stay Active

    September 23, 2010 at 09:00 | Report abuse | Reply
  13. Mark

    stop taking the drugs – then no more side effects to improve concentration

    October 10, 2010 at 13:12 | Report abuse | Reply
  14. oldmanstauf

    Up until this June, I’d been taking an antidepressant called Zoloft for about 8 years and 10 months of the preceding 9 years. The fact that I’m no longer taking Zoloft is an accident of history: I had a lot of trouble obtaining Clozaril, a medication I was instructed to take with Zoloft. When it became impossible for me to obtain Clozaril, I stopped taking Zoloft, not merely out of frustration (though I admit that played a part), but because I believed that if my doctor had wanted me to take Zoloft without Clozaril, she would have prescribed it that way.

    The first 3 weeks without Zoloft were difficult. I experienced severe withdrawal symptoms (especially within the first 5 days). After a month went by, something interesting happened: the compulsive shopper in me which for almost a decade had fed my addiction for pro-audio equipment and computer accessories just up and died! I can’t think of any better way to explain it. It was like, despite the fact that I was more broke than I’d ever been, for the first time in as long as I could remember, financial security was on the horizon.

    You may be wondering “how could a drug prescribed to alleviate depression have any impact on your spending habits?” This is a good question for someone who (like myself) has been on both sides of Zoloft treatment. Based on my experience, while Zoloft can keep you from getting majorly depressed, it also has the unfortunate tendency of preventing you from feeling genuine happiness or joy. Even if you have sufficient insight into this reality to report it while you’re still on Zoloft, communicating this experience to your doctor will inevitably lead him to prescribe even more Zoloft, a decision which may not exacerbate the problem, but certainly won’t make it any better.

    So here you are, still not happy, taking 150 milligrams per day of Zoloft, a medication that’s clearly advertised as an “antidepressant”—literally, “that which fights depression”—and your choices are to console yourself by purchasing an Xbox 360 and a flatscreen TV or allow yourself to be convinced by your doctors that your unhappiness is a symptom of even bigger problems with names like “bipolar mania” or “schizoaffective disorder.”

    You may be wondering how you could sit across from your doctor and uncritically accept as diagnoses such obvious euphemisms for “crazy.” Well, consider this: what if each and every time you reduced or discontinued a medication you were taking in conjunction with Zoloft, you went insane?

    Around the time of my revelation that Zoloft can detract substantially from your happiness potential, I stumbled across an article online entitled “Antidepressant-Associated Mania and Psychosis Resulting in Psychiatric Admissions” which documented this very phenomenon (http://psychrights.org/research/Digest/AntiDepressants/DrJackson/Preda2001.pdf); three M.D.’s and a Ph.D published the research in a 2001 issue of "The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry." The article explains that more than 1 in every 13 people undergoing combination drug therapy for mental illness (by using “mood stabilizers” in conjunction with antidepressants, for example) will experience a break from reality upon reduction or discontinuation of the “other” drug (e.g., Depakote, Abilify, Haldol, Geodon, Clozaril, etc.). In theory, this response could occur when changing from one mood stabilizer to another, since one of the most frequently implemented methods of switching psychotropic medications (i.e., “cross-titration”) entails gradual discontinuation of the drug being replaced. Finally, according to the article, the mere process of beginning pharmacological therapy for depression (with a drug like Zoloft) can induce psychosis.

    Suddenly, the last 9 years of my life began to make sense: my first outpatient psychiatrist diagnosed the “psychotic features” of my depression soon after I started Zoloft (when I insisted that my then-girlfriend had a metallic, foreign object in her body). Psychotic symptoms resurfaced during another treatment experiment with a psychiatrist near my new address, where reduction of antipsychotics I’d been taking since the aforementioned delusion was reversed after erratic thoughts adversely affected my behavior at a friend’s engagement party. In 2007, I received treatment from a doctor who, though far and away the most competent and knowledgeable psychiatrist I’d ever worked with, subjected me to grave danger by virtue of her insights into the perils of Zoloft treatment: lowering my Zoloft prescription from 150 to 125 milligrams despite my strong objections and the circumstances aggravating my depression (financial strain) contributed to the state of despair that precipitated my suicide attempt in Fall of 2008. Barely three weeks after my admission to a Manhattan acute mental healthcare facility (following my discharge from the affiliated ICU), I received care from a psychiatrist who continued the treatment plan developed and initiated by my recent inpatient psychiatrist: gradual discontinuation of an antipsychotic while still taking Zoloft (after grudgingly returning to that hospital for observation a few weeks later, I was committed by way of a “two physicians certificate").

    Naturally, I was reluctant to defer to the expertise of my inpatient doctor the second time I came under her care (just weeks after she discharged me on a treatment regimen that generated the kind of chemical imbalance that causes people to seek psychiatric help in the first place). What ensued was my first-ever, sustained period of non-compliance with my treatment plan. At various times throughout this confinement, the intensity of my delusions was such that I kissed my sister-in-law on the lips (thinking I was on a “reality show” that wouldn’t release me until I kissed someone), stabbed myself repeatedly in the wrist, and (while in solitary confinement) drank a cup of my own urine (thinking my right to refuse a vasectomy was conditioned on my performance of this disgusting task). These experiences easily comprise one of the most traumatic periods of my life. Even my admission two years later to another facility—-where my doctor's manipulation of dosages and varieties of antipsychotics and mood stabilizers while on Zoloft induced suicidality and terrifying delusions-—even that wasn’t as bad.

    People who know my story sometimes ask "why not sue the doctors or the hospitals that treated you? They're the ones who failed to recognize Zoloft's disastrous impact on your health." While I believe the culpability of these entities and individuals is hardly debatable, I feel such remarks miss the point.

    The point (as I see it) is that if 1 out of every 13 automobiles to roll off an assembly line is destined to spontaneously combust, the vehicle's engineer should be held as (if not more) accountable as the poor slob who moves them through the showroom.

    Given the number of other people who've undoubtedly been rendered incapable of working by virtue of their antidepressant-induced "thought disorders," corporations that research, manufacture, and distribute antidepressants should be required to pay punitive damages to Medicaid and Social Security, the institutions healthcare executives have the nerve to complain are disproportionately subsidized by their tax dollars. It might not bring us any closer to a consensus regarding which symptoms constitute "schizoaffective disorder"–but it will be an important step towards eradicating the perverse incentives afflicting our mental health system.

    October 11, 2010 at 12:54 | Report abuse | Reply
  15. Carol Johnson

    Thanks for your comments, Susan. I was on many AD's and benzo's for years! Doc had me up to 450 mgs. of Effexor XR a day. Finally, down to 75 mg. of it and off everything else. Wow, what a nightmare these drugs can be. I take 5-HTP and Melontin for sleep now and have never felt better. It's so nice to hear about others struggles and success in putting these meds behind them!

    October 12, 2010 at 13:10 | Report abuse | Reply
  16. Christa Jahn

    I have been on Paxil for about 12 years. I only take about 5-7.50 mg a day. I have no side effect from the drug that I can tell, but I want to get off of it. All the storys I hear are scarying the hell out of me! Is there anyone out there who had only mild withdrawal symptoms during a slow weening process, because that is how I will do it even if it takes a year!

    October 25, 2010 at 14:05 | Report abuse | Reply
    • JRosy

      Christa,

      I wouldn't worry too much about withdrawal symptoms if you are taking less than 10 mg. I was taking 30mg a day for at least 10 years. I recently dropped down to 15 for a few weeks and am now taking about 7.5mg. I am only experiencing mild symptoms, such as dizziness/nausea and mild headache. Nothing that is stopping me from normal daily activities. I am not a doctor though, so you should talk to your physician first.

      July 9, 2012 at 14:41 | Report abuse |
  17. Dawn

    I've been on Paxil on and off over the past 7 years. I weened myself off when I was five months pregnant with no problems and my child is very healthy and happy at age six. I will say that when she was born, she seemed to cry endlessly and never sleep and I have wondered if that might still have been an effect on her system of not getting the drug through me (she was also premature but a healthy birth weight). I am currently weening off Paxil again right now. I was on 10mg/day for 18 months. I cut down to 5mg/day for a week and then quit. I've been off for four days now. At first, I had episodes of feeling sort of out-of-body–disconnected to reality and living in a haze. It has been getting less and less everyday. When I feel like this, I use self-talk to stave off an anxiety attack that something bad is happening to me. I explain to myself that this is a withdrawal effect of the medication and that it will pass and I will be fine. It seems to work for me. I will say that over the past few days, I have noticed that I am having more emotions and it feels great. Although I really needed the Paxil to get me through a rough time in my life, I began to feel emotionally dead. I remain hopeful that my transition off the drug will continue to go smoothly and I wish all those out there going through the same thing the best.

    November 24, 2010 at 08:25 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Debi

      Just read your post. Hope you continue to progress. Today has been really rough; day 3 for me. Good Luck.

      November 24, 2010 at 15:39 | Report abuse |
  18. Debi

    I have been on Paxil 10mg for a year now, since the death of my mom. I am 35 yrs old and have wiened myself down over the last two months. I cut the 10mg tablets in two and only took 5mg a night. I am now out of meds and the last few days have been pure hell. I am very irritably. woke up with a horrible headache this am and can not stop feeling "angry". All I want to do is lay in bed.

    The reason why I cut myself off.....my Doctor moved out of town and since I do not have health insurance through my job; i had to pay over $100 to see the new doctor and get another script. Could no longer afford it, unfortunatly. Paxil did help me cope with my severe depression but I dislike these feelings!!!! and tomorrow is Thanksgiving and I sure hope I feel better. :)

    November 24, 2010 at 15:36 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Dawn

      Good luck Debi. Sending good thoughts your way.

      November 24, 2010 at 16:00 | Report abuse |
    • terri

      On the Dr. Oz show, I heard about Oxytocin. The Oxytocin is like a miracle for me. You can order it online. It has really saved me. I am down to 10 mg of Paxil and hopefully can continue to get this crap out of my body

      August 24, 2012 at 23:47 | Report abuse |
  19. CHeryl

    I was put on paxil b/c I have had a hysterectomy and they wanted me off of hormones and said this would help the night sweats etc... that menopausel women go thru.

    August 23, 2011 at 23:00 | Report abuse | Reply
  20. nelia

    I am ^weeks pregnant and also need to stop taking Aropax any help please!!!

    November 7, 2011 at 02:14 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Arati

      My dear consult your doctor as soon as possible, medicine is not good in pregenency.Don't worry dear there are many other natural ways to get rid of this misery..you are pregenent so i cannot suggest myself ,it would be better to take the help of yoga and meditation expert.Its harmless techinique ,and i swear you will get full benifits without any side-effects.It is better for and your child too.

      December 9, 2011 at 21:10 | Report abuse |
  21. exmen

    i think you mean propranolol. its a beta aeerndrgic antagonist (most people call that class of drug beta blockers ) basically what it does is slow your heart down, which reduces the amount of extra beats you get. as far as how well it works, some people it works great; they hardly ever get any on beta blockers. other people feel like it doesnt help them at all. its a pretty cheap drug, probably ~$10-15/month. some of the common side effects you may or may not get are drowsiness, depression (usually only if you have a history of it), weird dreams, and low excercise tolerance (you'll get tired faster from walking around or working out if you exercise), but lots of times the side effects go away afer you've taken it for a week or two. its usually pretty well tolerated. if you have a history of depression you'd probably be better off switching to atenolol. just bring it in to a pharmacy and talk to the pharmacist about it if you have questions/concerns. really, if you have a thyroid problem they should try to treat that, and it would probably take care of the palpitations. hope that helps.

    April 7, 2012 at 21:27 | Report abuse | Reply
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    September 20, 2012 at 13:17 | Report abuse | Reply
  23. Jennifer cost

    I have been on paxil for over ten years now . I wanted to become pregnant. I heard the side effects of comming off paxil could be bad . I quit cold turked . It was the worst thing i have ever expeirenced . I felt like a walking disaster ups and downs crying all the time mood swings complete mental torture . don't get me wrong love the pill it helps my anxiety and depression but what about pregnancy it's a complete nightmare . We have to go through this everytime we want to become pregnant .

    September 24, 2012 at 09:52 | Report abuse | Reply
  24. Shirley

    I have been on paxil for 23 years and I lost my health care insurance, so I decided to stop all my medications except my beta blocker. I stopped cold turkey and I have been feeling like I have the flu, its been now about 3 weeks and I still don't feel quite like myself. Every so often I get a buzzing in my ear, but not all the time. I have episodes of crying spells and not feeling myself. But I am determined to stay off this medication and take one day at a time.

    November 12, 2012 at 15:10 | Report abuse | Reply
    • James

      I have been on Paroxetine (generic paxil) for 3 yrs and experienced all the ugly side effects when stopping cold turkey. I was taking 25mg a day and cut them in half and took the ahlf for about 3 weeks, cut them in half and took that for the same amont of time, and still to this day am getting small amonuts of the side effects after a 2 weeks of not taking it. It will affect everyone diffrently. But as long as you cut the dosage in small increments it can be done. Dosent seem like it, but it can be done :) Good luck, all of you and be well.

      December 6, 2012 at 12:24 | Report abuse |
  25. Buy Cisco

    I savour, lead to I discovered exactly what I was taking a look for. You have ended my four day long hunt! God Bless you man. Have a great day. Bye

    December 5, 2012 at 12:09 | Report abuse | Reply
  26. csc

    I've been on Paxil for 22 years and add another couple of years before that for Prozac. First prescribed for depression. What a NIGHTMARE! When I finally realized why my life had gone to HELL because of these meds, I began experimenting with taperring off. BE ADVISED: taper slowly! After spending 3 years of my life taperring from 30mg to 7.6mg and remaining at 7.6 for 1 year and in shear mental torture and anquish, I reluctantly and painfully realized that this long term usage had literally damaged my brain. I reluctantly added about 4 mg of Prozac to the 7.6 mg Paxil and was able to function in my job, relationships and life, but crippled and handicapped. I have stayed at that dose for 3 years and am now beginning to attempt to taper again with much fear but also much faith/hope. If I could go back in time, I would do ANYTHING to resolve my depression rather than take an AD. I went from a highly functioning bright graduate student in a difficult program of study to nearly homeless and friendless after 10 years of taking the drugs. I was a shell of my former self. It wasn't until about 15 years into AD use that I began to suspect that this drug may be the PROBLEM- i.e. reason for no memory, loss of cognitive skills, disconnection from life, people, sexual problems, weight gain, the list goes on and on. Once I started taperring I realized that I was correct...cognitive abilities began to come back but natural serotonin production was GONE. I was kind of a monster in human form- incredible anger and just mental anquish. This was not my personality before ADs! I am a fighter and survivor and will press on no matter what, but these drugs are pure evil in the long run. I look forward to the day when the purveyors of this poison will be held accountable.

    November 14, 2013 at 08:57 | Report abuse | Reply
  27. mommadebba

    I am on 20mg of PARoxetine HCI and have cut the pill in half to ween off this medication. I just curious if anyone else agree's with this. I am also really upset that my so called doctor never told me about the side effects of going off this medication. The dizzy spells are killing me..I want out of the hell. I don't have insurance so I wanted to go off these without paying $100 to see the doctor just to find out how to go off them. Any suggestions?

    March 30, 2014 at 20:23 | Report abuse | Reply
  28. Eric

    Paxil is not the answer it has destroyed my life. Stay away from ad,s and get into church it's free.

    June 16, 2014 at 12:38 | Report abuse | Reply
  29. Eric

    Paxil. Take it if you want no sex drive, weight gain, feeling numb, can't remember nothing and best of all you go through pure Hell to get off it.

    June 16, 2014 at 12:45 | Report abuse | Reply
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Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.