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Better childhood nutrition needed, retired military officials say
September 21st, 2010
04:10 PM ET

Better childhood nutrition needed, retired military officials say

Military leaders along with U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack urged Congress to pass child nutrition legislation by September 30.

The Improving Nutrition for America’s Children Act of 2010 would boost the nutritional value of school meals by using more fruits and vegetables and by eliminating junk food, such as the ones found in school vending machines. The Senate version passed in August, and now it’s left to the House of Representatives, which would need to pass its version before the legislation expires September 30. The House is expected to take up the re-authorization before the deadline, since the bill has passed out of committee with bipartisan support.

More than 100 retired generals and admirals signed a letter to Congress describing the child nutrition bill as crucial to reducing childhood obesity and helping national security, by creating a pool of young adults who qualify for military service. FULL POST


September 21st, 2010
10:23 AM ET

How can I stop using Paxil without the side effects?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Tuesdays, it's Dr. Charles Raison, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Emory University, and an expert in the mind-body connection for health.

Question asked by Sharon Reynolds of Tampa, Florida: I have been taking 10 mg of Paxil for nine years. I would like to get off of it but have heard of the many side effects associated with stopping it. Brain "buzzes" and various other frightening possibilities.

How can I stop Paxil without those side effects? I started taking it after a complete hysterectomy that resulted in extreme anxiety.

FULL POST


September 21st, 2010
08:56 AM ET

Study: Obesity may slim down your wallet

More than a third of American men and women are obese. According to a new study, the excess weight doesn't just weigh heavily on their health, but on their wallets as well.

The economic costs of being obese can be as much as $4,879 for a woman, and $2,646 for a man per year, according to the report.

FULL POST


September 21st, 2010
08:48 AM ET

Cyber bully victims 'isolated, dehumanized'

There is no question that venomous, nasty insults hurled across the cafeteria or in school hallways hurt. A new survey published in the Journal of Adolescent Health finds that for victims of cyber bullying (insults that occur online or via text), that hurt may be more pronounced.

"Unlike traditional bullying which usually involves a face-to-face confrontation, cyber victims may not see or identify their harasser," according to the survey. "As such, cyber victims may be more likely to feel isolated, dehumanized or helpless at the time of the attack."
 
FULL POST


September 21st, 2010
12:05 AM ET

Report: Alzheimer's disease causes global financial burden

The cost of caring for people with dementia around the world tops $600 billion according to a report released Tuesday. "70 percent of the costs occur in Western Europe and North America," according to the report.

With the release of the World Alzheimer's Report 2010, Alzheimer's Disease International (ADI), a consortium of 73 non-profit Alzheimer's groups from around the world, is trying to raise awareness about the global financial burden caused by dementia.

Each year ADI issues a report on September 21, which has been designated as World Alzheimer's Day.
FULL POST


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Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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