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September 17th, 2010
05:00 PM ET

FDA reviews diabetes drug Actos

Another diabetes drug is under the Food and Drug Administration's microscope amid safety concerns. On Friday, the agency announced preliminary five-year data shows Actos can increase the risk of bladder cancer in patients using the drug long-term.

Pioglitazone, marketed as Actos, is one of two drugs used to control blood sugar in diabetics.  The data are from a 10-year study by the manufacturer Takeda Pharmaceuticals of San Diego.  The early results did not show an overall link between use and the risk of bladder cancer, but taking the drug for a long time or in high doses may increase the risk, according to the study.

In July a FDA advisory committee looked at whether to pull GlaxoSmithKline's diabetes drug  Avandia off the market because of concerns it increased the risk of heart attack and stroke.  FULL POST


September 17th, 2010
11:11 AM ET

How do I put my 11-year-old on a diet?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Friday, it's Dr. Melina Jampolis, a physician nutrition specialist.

Question asked by Asked by Lisa

How do I put my 11-year-old daughter on a diet? She is 50 pounds overweight, though she only looks about 20 pounds over. She has a lot of muscle. She plays sports year-round.

She is a picky, picky eater. She has asked to go on a diet, but I don't think that an 11-year-old should, even though it's unhealthy to be so overweight. I have told her she will need to give up sweetened drinks, sweet snacks and white bread products.

Any other ideas that will not be too drastic but will show results?

FULL POST


September 17th, 2010
10:05 AM ET

TEDMED: Growing kidneys, windpipes

The first time an organ was ever transplanted to a human was a kidney transplant in 1954. There have been many advances, but there is a major shortage of organs, Dr. Anthony Atala said in his TEDMED talk.

Every 30 seconds, a patient dies from diseases that could be treated with tissue replacement, he said. FULL POST


September 17th, 2010
07:00 AM ET

More are uninsured; what to do

In the year prior to President Obama's passage of health care reform legislation, the number of people without health insurance grew by more than 4 million. 

50.7 million Americans lacked health insurance in 2009 compared to 46.3 million uninsured Americans in 2008 , according to the new U.S. Census Bureau data.

FULL POST


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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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