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September 13th, 2010
05:11 PM ET

American Heart Association: Smokeless tobacco increases risks

Smokeless tobacco products are not safe alternatives to smoking and could increase not only the risk of certain cancers , but also the risk of fatal heart attacks or strokes, according to the American Heart Association

Products like snuff and chewing tobacco can be addictive and increase the risk of relapse for those who have already quit smoking, said the AHA said in a policy statement release Monday. FULL POST


September 13th, 2010
04:45 PM ET

Study: Whites with muscular dystrophy live up to 12 years longer than blacks

Whites with muscular dystrophy live up to 12 years longer than their African American counterparts, according to a study published Monday in Neurology.

Although medical advancements over a period of 20 years increased the life span of patients with the debilitating muscle disease, those improvements haven’t been equal among different groups. FULL POST


September 13th, 2010
04:26 PM ET

CDC: Many moms start breastfeeding, but drop off

Moms are encouraged to breastfeed exclusively for the first six months after they give birth, but how many actually follow that advice?

It turns out that 75 percent babies start breastfeeding, but only 43 percent are still being breastfed at 6 months of age, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 2010 Breastfeeding Report Card. Even fewer are exclusively breastfed: At age 3 months 33 percent receive breast milk and no other foods or liquids. This is true for 13 percent of babies at age 6 months. 

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September 13th, 2010
12:35 PM ET

'Freaky eaters' cling to same food everyday

TLC’s new show that started September 5 shows people with a compulsion toward a particular food, meaning they eat only one item -  like cheeseburgers, french fries or pizzas - all the time.

On the upcoming shows, a 29-year-old mother eats only french fries and a 34 year-old diabetic is addicted to cheeseburgers.  In “Freaky Eaters,” psychotherapist Dr. Mike Dow and nutrition specialist J.J. Virgin, intervene to figure out what compels the finicky eaters to obsess over the same food. FULL POST


September 13th, 2010
11:41 AM ET

How can I get rid of poison ivy?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Mondays, it's pediatrician Jennifer Shu.

Question asked by Stephanie of Westchester County, New York: I have had recurring poison ivy on my face for a month. It went away but now it's back. I've tried a week of prednisone and am now using hydrocortisone cream. I would love to work in the yard but don't want to get it again. Any ideas? Thanks.

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September 13th, 2010
12:02 AM ET

Study: Men with low initial PSA levels less likely to develop prostate cancer

Men with low PSA levels from a baseline blood test were less likely to develop prostate cancer compared to men whose baseline PSA levels were high, according to a new study.

The simple test may be a strong predictor of who will benefit from future screening and treatment for prostate cancer, according to the study published Monday in the journal Cancer.

More than 85,000 men, ages 55 to 74, with no previous prostate cancer history were the subjects of the study. The authors found that in order to save one life, they needed to investigate almost  25,000 men with low PSA levels but only 133 men with high ones. Similarly, they needed to treat 724 men who had low PSA levels to save one life but only 60 men whose levels were higher.

FULL POST


September 13th, 2010
12:01 AM ET

Study: Number of traumatic brain injuries jump among young basketball players

More and more children and teenagers are suffering traumatic brain injuries while playing basketball, according to a study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics.

Researchers examined emergency room visits of people under the age of 20 who were treated for basketball related injuries between 1997 and 2007 and found the number of traumatic brain injuries shot up  by 70%.

Overall the proportion for traumatic brain injury doubled for boys and tripled for girls, said senior study author Dr. Laura B. McKenzie. 

FULL POST


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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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