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September 3rd, 2010
04:37 PM ET

Osteoporosis drugs may boost cancer risk

People who take bisphosphonates, or bone-strengthening drugs for osteoporosis, may have a slightly higher risk of developing esophageal cancer, especially if they take them for several years, a study out this week in the British Journal of Medicine finds.

Researchers tracked almost 3,000 people with cancer of the esophagus or throat for eight years and compared them with a group of 15,000 people who did not have the disease. All were over age 40. The scientists found that 90 of the cancer patients had been prescribed the bone-building drugs, while 345 people in the larger group were taking the medication.

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September 3rd, 2010
03:40 PM ET

Latest hand transplant patient shows progress

The third person in the United States to receive a double hand transplant can already move his fingers.

Last month, in a first-of-its-kind procedure, doctors at the Jewish Hospital Hand Care Center were able to salvage most of the nerves and tendons in Richard Edwards' hands. They left his original hands intact and connected nerves to restore their function.

Now, Edwards can make a full fist with one hand and a half-fist with the other. His doctors say his progress is a good sign and that Edwards is six months ahead of where they suspected he would be.

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September 3rd, 2010
10:04 AM ET

What are healthy options to frozen entrees?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Friday, it's Dr. Melina Jampolis, a physician nutrition specialist.

Question asked by Alicia Perry of Cedar Rapids, Iowa: My husband, who is 50, learned he had type 2 diabetes in March 2008. He also has hypertension. Are there any healthy alternatives to the processed frozen entrees we find in the grocery stores? I am trying to make him healthy foods but it is difficult.

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September 3rd, 2010
08:45 AM ET

Illegal immigrants to receive dialysis care

A tentative agreement has been reached to provide 38 Atlanta, Georgia, area patients – most of whom are illegal immigrants - with continuous dialysis care, free of charge. The ruling settles a case that drew national attention and raised thorny ethical and financial questions about who should administer health care and pay for the medical bills of illegal immigrants.

Last year a dialysis clinic attached to a public hospital closed, leaving about 60 patients with no place to get the life saving treatment. They were offered help to return to their countries of origin by Grady Memorial Hospital. FULL POST


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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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