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August 9th, 2010
12:00 PM ET

Why some people can sleep through anything

Everyone, even the lightest sleeper, is less aware of noise while they sleep. So what helps us in blocking the outside world when we need to re-juice? And what makes some people deeper sleepers than others?

Dr. Jeff Ellenbogen, chief of Massachusetts General Hospital’s Division of Sleep Medicine, led a study looking at particular brain waves called sleep spindles. How many spindles a person’s mind cranks out while sleeping predicts how deep he or she sleeps while bombarded with noise, his study in Current Biology found.

While sleeping, a person’s brain waves become slower and more regular. Sporadically, the brain has bursts of higher-frequency waves called sleep spindles. These bursts, which occur only when a person is sleeping, were dubbed “spindles” because they look like rolls of yarn on an electroencephalograph (EEG), which measures the electronic activity fired by neurons in the brain.

In the experiment, Ellenbogen studied healthy volunteers placed in a sleep laboratory for three consecutive nights. On the first night, participants could blissfully rest in a lofty queen-size bed and fresh, soft sheets without interruption. Ellenbogen and colleagues measured their brain rhythms and noted how often spindles occurred.

The second and third night, the researchers placed a speaker behind the sleepers and played everyday noises, such as alarm clocks or toilets flushing, at varying volumes and noted how loud a noise had to be before arousing each person. According to the study, those with higher spindle rates on the quiet night were more stable sleepers on the noisier nights.

As a person ages, he or she produces fewer spindles and is more sensitive to noises while sleeping. This could explain why people don’t sleep as well after getting older, Ellenbogen said.

Researchers have also found a correlation between spindle rate and learning potential. One study released in 2007 found that the more spindles pumped out while sleeping, the higher the person’s performance IQ was. The more spindles a person produces while they sleep, the better a person consolidates memories, Ellenbogen’s study report cites.

Long-term, Ellenbogen hopes to find natural ways to enhance sleep and all its benefits. We can’t always be in a quiet environment while getting some shut-eye, so he wants to help people make the best of their rest.

He wants to figure out whether sleeping drugs really catalyze genuine sleep or just a sleep-like state, and believes this link between spindles and deeper sleeping will be a tool in doing so.

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Filed under: Sleep

soundoff (66 Responses)
  1. ssllpp

    One study released in 2007 found that the more spindles pumped out while sleeping, the higher the person’s performance IQ was......LOL i'd be the exception to that study

    August 9, 2010 at 13:50 | Report abuse | Reply
  2. Sleeeeeeep

    I can sleep through most anything. I am often late to work because I don't hear my alarm clock. I've heard all the studies about how you sleep less and not as well as you get older... well just how much older do you have to be? I'm almost 50 and I still sleep like the dead. I am pretty smart except when i somes to machines and cars – I just don't want to know about them... anyway would love to see a study on those of us who regularly sleep through the alarm clocks

    August 9, 2010 at 14:44 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Mike

      To Sleeeeeep not all people loose sleep as they grow older, it is a trend, not a law. A clean conscience helps us to sleep. So does intelligence, and men seem to generally have fewer sleep problems than women do, but that too is not a law, only a trend. So, you can get a louder alarm clock, LOL, or try to get to sleep earlier.

      August 9, 2010 at 14:57 | Report abuse |
    • cristenbee

      I thought I was the only one who sleeps through the alarm clock! I am an RN who works 12 hour shifts, and I sleep on my one hour lunch break, and I need to have another RN come in and SHAKE me awake. Crazy.

      August 10, 2010 at 02:58 | Report abuse |
    • David

      cristenbee...another example why doctors and nurse should not be working 12 hour shifts! Which hospital do you work at again? LOL.

      August 23, 2010 at 08:28 | Report abuse |
    • Angela

      http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delayed_sleep_phase_disorder

      November 9, 2012 at 09:36 | Report abuse |
    • C

      They say if you get up at a multiple of a 90 minute stage you will not sleep through the alarm. Like if you went to bed at 10 set your alarm for 7 and not 6 or 6:30 because then you're getting up in the middle of stage 3 sleep while at 7 you're starting the cycle over at stage 2 and you wake up easier.

      August 10, 2013 at 18:40 | Report abuse |
  3. DB

    I wish they could have tied this to evolution. The fittest would be the ones who could wake up to danger to save themselves, but then sleep well when its okay. I could see as the person ages, survival would mean more of 'flee' than 'fight.' May need more time/notice to 'flee', and hence sleep lightly. Other explanation could be older men are more likely to lose 'resources' (food, weapons) which may be sparse to begin with. So light sleeping should help. My guess, please. Somebody could confirm it.

    August 9, 2010 at 15:00 | Report abuse | Reply
    • partly true

      I know for myself, I can sleep through most anything, though I do wake when needed. I can sleep through a storm, or normal household noises. Though I will awake without any problem when I hear uncommon noises or movement. For example I have awoken twice to glass breaking on neighbors houses with someone trying to get in and rob the place. Both times where to only the glass, and not to alarms going off. I also awake to uncommon movement, like if the girlfriend falls asleep with her head on me or arm across my chest, I will wake to that movement, no matter how suttle.

      I would be interested to know what triggers the brain to wake especially to the glass noise but not the other noises. As I like others have said require multiple alarms to make sure I am up in time.

      August 9, 2010 at 15:14 | Report abuse |
    • Phil

      I think that the lighter one sleeps may correlate to amount of worrisome-ness that person experiences while awake. If one is convinced that (for example) that "whats happening is going to happen whether I sleep or not, so I may as well get the rest I need to deal with it tomorrow with a clear and rested head so i can have a fresh sense of outlook."

      August 9, 2010 at 16:08 | Report abuse |
    • Claudia

      That is because tying it to something unscientific as evolution would be incredibly stupid. Time and time again, human behaviors and attitudes prove the whole 'survival of the fittest' theory is a bunch of crap.

      August 10, 2010 at 19:33 | Report abuse |
  4. Chessnutz of Liverpool NY

    How can you compete in a global economy and sleep? Sleep is so over rated, my employer has a rule all customer questions must we answered in thirty minutes. I have seen many who fail to answer a Email at 3 AM come in the next day to no job.
    Don't sleep! Keep updating your twitter feeds, your facebook status, e-mail, check the Blackberry, phones calls and get the kids to band camp on time! No pressure if you can not do it we will find someone who will!
    There is plenty of time to sleep once you are dead. But sleeping is like peeing it is a loss of productive time. LOL

    August 9, 2010 at 15:09 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Kayla

      I know what you mean! I am up till the crack of dawn my BB goes off all the time and I am a stay at home mom, if it's not mine then my husbands employers want to be able to get a hold of him at all hours of the day and night. If he misses a phone call it could totally change the way his day turns out and what needs to be done.

      August 12, 2010 at 02:10 | Report abuse |
    • Chris

      Sorry, but that's idiotic. I'd never sign on for a job like that. It sounds downright abusive. If you don't need sleep, don't sleep, but most of us do. It is also definitely not a waste of time. If you would look into what scientists know about sleep, you might just realize that there are things missing from your life.

      August 18, 2010 at 19:59 | Report abuse |
    • Fran MacPhee

      to prioritize work over one's health could shorten your life,so your no sleep ,all work ethic may work for you but most people want to live longer healthier lives,and can do so and still have a good work ethic,that will not kill them,while you may get lots of sleep while your dead ,you'll get no work or anything else done,LOL!

      February 2, 2013 at 09:18 | Report abuse |
  5. Jane

    Once our neighbor's garage caught on fire in the middle of the night. We had a fire truck in our driveway, and people were running all around putting out the fire and throwing burning materials outsdie. My husband woke up and helped put out the fire, but my daughter (whose room was right next to the driveway) and I both slept right through all the noise and activity and only found out about the fire the next morning when we saw all the burned things strewn around the driveway and yard. I might add that my IQ qualified me for membership in MENSA>

    August 9, 2010 at 15:15 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Rewdmm

      It's Mensa, not MENSA. It's a Latin word that means "table", rather than an acronym.

      August 9, 2010 at 17:05 | Report abuse |
    • Anne

      not being able to wake up when there is imminent danger would tag you as stupid in my world.

      August 9, 2010 at 22:33 | Report abuse |
    • Debster

      My God, you people are lame. She's sharing an important experience in her life in regard to sleep and what do you do? You basically call her a dipstick. F-you to both of you. I don't know Jane but I'd wager that she's smarter than both of you and has found a way to be able to achieve restful sleep that many of us would sincerely envy her to have ourselves. I know I do...
      I suffer for hours to fall asleep and can't help but wake to every tiny noise in the house. If I take a sleeping pill, I pay for it with extreme lethargy the next day. Some of us can just *not* sleep...and we would love to be like Jane. So shut the hell up with your stupid comments. She gets good sleep at night. Jane will probably outlive us all.

      August 10, 2010 at 01:17 | Report abuse |
    • Jackie

      ANNE: Shut your piehole you dumb slut. Sleeping patterns have nothing to do with intelligence. So if a person has sleep apnea he is an idiot? I hope you die.

      August 10, 2010 at 19:35 | Report abuse |
    • David

      If you ever live alone, you should get a really smart dog that can wake you up if there is danger....cause if you can sleep through fire trucks and all that comotion, then thats really dangerous.

      August 23, 2010 at 08:35 | Report abuse |
  6. Pirk

    hahaha...Ellenbogen means Elbow in German!

    August 9, 2010 at 15:16 | Report abuse | Reply
  7. Elsie Elaine Connelly

    If only I could sleep. I have chronic insomnia, cannot sleep at all without the aid of drugs. I still have to work, when I get a chance to retire, will try to master the insomnia, but as long as I have to work 8-5 Mon-Fri, I cherish my sleep aids, without them I am a complete biatch. Just come and try me with out any sleep. I double dog guarantee you that you will be going out and buying me sleep aids by the case.

    August 9, 2010 at 15:57 | Report abuse | Reply
  8. Patty

    My husband (though he denies this) is snoring within five minutes of hitting the pillow and I had to scold him for telling our teen daughter that he doesn't hear anything all night. Me, it seems I'm awake every half hour (probably because of his snoring!) and can hear my daughter typing on her computer keyboard (I hate term papers!) It is a "mom" thing? Maybe... and yes, I would consider my husband more IQ'd than me, though we have never tested. He is able to retain the oddest information and I love him for it!

    August 9, 2010 at 15:59 | Report abuse | Reply
  9. Tom in Kansas

    I found that reading this article helped me produce more spindles and enter a deeper state of rest. Kudos to MS Russell for developing a drugless sleep aid.

    August 9, 2010 at 16:13 | Report abuse | Reply
  10. Linda

    I am also MENSA qualified, and I wake up to "fuzz" on the alarm, meaning I set the radio alarm clock between stations, and turn down the volume to its lowest setting because any sound disturbance at all, and I pop up. My husband would not wake up (and in fact did not) wake up when our house was on fire. I frankly attribute it to my maternal instinct, and my Type A personality– I am always worrying. I don't think it has much to do with intelligence– far more to do with our personality type. There is probably an overlap in Type A personalities (overachievers) and intelligence.

    August 9, 2010 at 16:16 | Report abuse | Reply
  11. cindy

    i have insomnia and don't sleep much at all. Very tiring...........

    August 9, 2010 at 16:36 | Report abuse | Reply
  12. Melissa

    Noises "rouse" people, they don't "arouse" them. Though I suppose you never know–maybe doorbells and flushing toilets really do turn some people on.

    August 9, 2010 at 16:57 | Report abuse | Reply
  13. Ryan

    So here's my contribution to the CNN world for today....a simple spelling lesson. L-o-s-e. L-o-s-e. L-o-s-e. As in if you wake up early you will lose sleep. It is not LOOSE. C'mon people.

    Okay, so aside from that, I have a moderately high IQ, 135-140, and I sleep like the dead. Then again, I know people who can't sleep through a pin drop who are equally intelligent so I'm not so sure there is a coorelation.

    August 9, 2010 at 17:02 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Ruth

      It is c-o-r-r-e-l-a-t-i-o-n, not coorelation.

      August 9, 2010 at 18:05 | Report abuse |
    • maggie

      lol Ruth

      August 10, 2010 at 16:41 | Report abuse |
    • Jackie

      I am willing to bet the nutjob who came up with this crack-pot theory is a light sleeper with low self-esteem and needs to justify something so asinine as this to make herself feel better.

      August 10, 2010 at 19:43 | Report abuse |
  14. Brett

    I once slept through an earthquake that shook me out of my bed and onto the floor. It also tipped over my full-sized bookcase full of stuff. I was surprised when I woke up in the morning. I thought someone had played a prank on me.

    August 9, 2010 at 17:10 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Liutgard

      All three of my kids sleep like the dead. Last time we had a good-sized earthquake here in the Portland area (OR) not one of them woke up from the shaking. My son did wake up afterward, confused because he didn't know why he was on the floor with Mom curled around him!

      August 9, 2010 at 18:36 | Report abuse |
  15. Ellen

    Interesting. When I was in my 20s I was threatened with termination more than once because none of my THREE alarm clocks (set 15 minutes apart) could wake me. I had "learned" how to get up, walk across the room to shut them off, and go back to bed without ever waking up. I also had a fireman break my apartment door open once because I failed to wake up when the building was on fire. He said he had been pounding on it with an axe handle. It was sheer chaos outside, but I never awoke until he crashed through the door, shouting at the top of his lungs.
    Now I'm 50, and nothing has changed! My IQ is 138 - a lot of good it does me if I can't get to work on time, LOL.

    August 9, 2010 at 17:25 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Gretchen

      Our former neighbor had left a bbq going one night and fell asleep, my wife woke up smelling smoke, woke ME up, called 911. It took the firefighters pounding on downstairs neighbor's front door with an axe handle to wake her up!

      August 9, 2010 at 19:25 | Report abuse |
  16. deb

    I think there is some validity to this study. The older I've gotten (I'm 58) the more I wake up during the night and the lighter I sleep. I also cannot sleep if there are weird noises (TV, people walking around on the hardwood floors of my house, etc). I wear earplugs EVERY night whether or not my husband (who snores, talks, yells out and sings during his dreams/nightmares...yes, it's a real thrill...not!) is in the same bed! I used to sleep very soundly and never woke up. As long as I fell asleep BEFORE my husband did I wouldn't wake up to his many noises. Now any little thing wakes me up.

    August 9, 2010 at 17:34 | Report abuse | Reply
  17. oddone

    Hey, who cares if you're MENSA or mensa qualified. You sleeping thru anything?

    August 9, 2010 at 17:40 | Report abuse | Reply
  18. 4U Mr.

    I can sleep just fine, as long as the room is not too hot or too cold, and is very dark (light-blocking curtains), and I am wearing my earplugs that block 33 decibles. Otherwise, not so much...

    August 9, 2010 at 17:41 | Report abuse | Reply
  19. 4U Mr.

    Oh, and my IQ has tested as low as 123 and as high as 127...not sure why IQ would make a difference with sleep.

    August 9, 2010 at 17:43 | Report abuse | Reply
    • BARF FACE

      This is quite possibly the GAYEST study ever conceived.

      August 10, 2010 at 19:44 | Report abuse |
  20. cincydiane

    how do all these people know their IQ's? Sounds like some very unsavory testing going on out there.

    August 9, 2010 at 19:15 | Report abuse | Reply
  21. Sofia

    wow you all are brilliant. I am honored to be amongst such geniuses!

    August 9, 2010 at 19:39 | Report abuse | Reply
  22. OMG

    http://www.dockpenguins.com/

    August 9, 2010 at 20:25 | Report abuse | Reply
  23. CJ

    I tend to be sensitive not to most specific noises, but any change in noise. If it starts raining in the middle of the night, I wake up. Alternately, if the power goes off for some reason, I wake up because the house seems too quiet. I actually can't fall asleep very well to silence at all, I've never been able to. I can wake up to an alarm clock when I need to, luckily. It's definitely frustrating though, especially during summer months, to be woken up and kept up by rain. It doesn't matter what I do, my body just won't relax enough to sleep. The few over the counter sleep aids I've tried either don't work at all, or they don't kick in until so late into the night that I oversleep or am horribly groggy the next day. It's simply an inconvenience that I've learned to live with, and it does have its upsides, as no one else in the house would know if a tornado was coming or not.

    August 9, 2010 at 20:52 | Report abuse | Reply
    • jaki

      I'm the samething as you , I wake up if someone walked outside my room even going to the restroom i dont know what to do I never get enough sleeping and always wake up tired, any advise

      December 7, 2012 at 10:15 | Report abuse |
  24. jayman419

    I wake up at the slightest sound in most instances, despite doing well on performance IQ and memory tests.

    Now my wife can carry on with whatever she wants to do whether I am asleep or not, and she doesn't bother me with most activities, even watching something on the computer or on TV which I am not familiar with does not generate a response. I do not wake up when the phone rings, and depending on who it is I'm often unaware the phone rang at all. But a familiar voice or an urgent message can snap me awake immediately. Thunderstorms do not wake me, but a carefully closed door can. Cars passing or parking on the street do not bother me, but one in my driveway certainly does.

    These things do not make me special, everyone does it. I'm not saying the whole study is flawed but I'm not sure the researcher has proven a sufficient causal link between spindles and maintaining a sleep state.

    My theory would be that the spindles are more related to intelligence, and that the brains of smarter people do more while they sleep than those with less intelligence, just like almost any activity involving the brain. Further, I propose having a higher intelligence allows sleeping individuals to better filter noises while they sleep, determining which ones are worth attention and which ones are not.

    Playing the sound of a toilet flushing to a research subject who lives in a dorm would generate less response than the same sound played to a retired man who lives alone. Playing a low-flying airplane to a subject who lives along their city's flight path would generate no response at all, while someone in the 'burbs would think the sky was falling and awaken in a panic.

    Without constant exposure to repeated sounds, the brain must decide if each sound, individually and taken as a whole, is worth interrupting the sleep process for. Brains that perform better at other tasks may also simply be better at making those decisions subconsciously.

    I don't think the research is useless. The data collected will be valuable in further efforts to understand what happens to us when we sleep, why we need to do it, and how to create the same brain activity without requiring so much time, even though I doubt spindles are all there is to that.

    August 9, 2010 at 22:24 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Grandpa DiaperFace

      I am not reading all of that ! What makes you think anyone wants to read your autobiography? This is simply for people to make brief comments on about the article. Its not for some blabberface to go OFF on something that no one gives to naked chipmunks about! DAG NABBIT!

      August 10, 2010 at 19:46 | Report abuse |
    • Susan

      Jay,
      What an excellent hypothesis! I too was thinking that "normal" noises was somewhat subjective. I sleep like the dead at home, most days my boyfriend has to wake me up as the alarm doesn't cut it. But I do not sleep well in unfamiliar places. Any little noise will wake me.

      August 12, 2010 at 01:29 | Report abuse |
  25. h.h.

    We need a good night of sleep in order to function well in this busy life. Just take it easy and relax.

    August 9, 2010 at 23:22 | Report abuse | Reply
  26. BadRequest

    The slightest noise wakes me up, I must be a moron.

    August 9, 2010 at 23:43 | Report abuse | Reply
  27. Jaime

    Good Night. ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ

    August 10, 2010 at 00:33 | Report abuse | Reply
  28. Russ Benson

    If the neighbors dogs are barking when I hit the hay, I cannot sleep, however once asleep I don't wake for anything except the alarm clock. My wife says I will often wake up, walk around, mumble a few things then go back to bed. I've been doing this for a while apparantly. I only hope I never walk out the front door, lol!

    August 10, 2010 at 00:34 | Report abuse | Reply
  29. Theresa

    My own feeling is, as people get older, they DO less – so they aren't as tired, and they don't sleep as well. I'm 54, and am "on the go" for 14-16 hours a day. I get in bed, fall asleep, and stay asleep. Despite having 4 kids, few sounds wake me. My husband's tv watching in bed doesn't wake me (although flipping channels can make it hard to FALL asleep – solved once I had him mute the sound before flipping). Go to the gym, do some physical work, get outside – you'll sleep better!

    August 10, 2010 at 01:12 | Report abuse | Reply
  30. John Enquire

    I sleep in industrial ear defenders ( Peltor Optime III ). It is possible to sleep on my side and, obviously, lying on my back when wearing these. My ears are sometimes a bit sore in the morning from rubbing, but that soon wears off. There are smaller Peltor models available if this is a problem. They are much better than cheap diy models. I also wear a travel sleeping eye mask. I couldn't sleep without these two now.
    Previously, I tried custom-made ear plugs as well, but, depending on the amount of ear wax produced by the wearer, they can cause problems. My wax was pushed down onto my ear drum, where it had to be removed by an ENT surgeon ( n.b. syringing, done at the GP, is not recommended ). Wax build-up can also be prevented by regularly using ear drops.

    August 10, 2010 at 04:57 | Report abuse | Reply
  31. Dr Bill Toth

    Exciting stuff. However it seems likely that sleep spindles are more related to information processing than sleep. And sleep studies are inherently flawed because the individuals are not in their normal environment, they know they're being watched and they typically have wires attached to them. Who can sleep "normally" in an abnormal environment? Live With Intention, DrBillToth.com/blog

    August 10, 2010 at 07:41 | Report abuse | Reply
  32. Tracy

    I use ear plugs to help me sleep. When I was younger, (I'm 40 now) I slept much more sound. Not any more. Although I'm not sure if this study took any outside factors into place. Such as becoming a parent. I noticed a huge difference in my ability to sleep through noises before and after I had my first child. Also as my kids (4 teenagers) got older I got much more nervous, which also contributed to light sleep. Ya know listening to hear who's sneaking in or out. Or up way past curfew lol. As far as intellect I'd say about average intelligence.

    August 10, 2010 at 09:23 | Report abuse | Reply
  33. butlerbulldawg74

    i've always been able to sleep through anything too...and it's only gotten worse, first after getting married, and then after having two kids. As a child, my siblings would literally have to punch me to get me to wake up.

    August 10, 2010 at 09:51 | Report abuse | Reply
  34. Girton

    This story poses a question which it does not answer. Confuses the instrumentation with the cause. Who cares?

    August 11, 2010 at 00:24 | Report abuse | Reply
  35. David

    I thought it was bad that my brother can sleep through the loudest alarm clock I have ever heard...not only is it so loud it can wake me even if i was in the neighbors house, he can sleep through it going off for an hour straight! Well after reading some of things you people sleep through, I don't think it's that bad anymore. HOW IN THE HELL CAN YOU SLEEP THROUGH AN EARTHQUAKE SHAKING YOU OUT OF BED AND FIRE TRUCKS IN YOUR DRIVE WAY?? This is bad!

    August 23, 2010 at 08:42 | Report abuse | Reply
  36. Connie

    I'm a sound sleeper , also deaf so no noise wakes me up, for those of you who can't hear your clock i have a special shake awake clock that i hook inside my pillow case and it never fails to wake me, maybe you ought to try one of those , you can get them at any of your local hearing aid places, i have the cohlear implant but don't wear it to bed.

    November 9, 2010 at 08:10 | Report abuse | Reply
  37. Aria

    I'm 13years old and I'm so sick if sleeping through everything and anything I've always been like that and its gotten to the point where I sleep through alarms, people pouring water on me, people yelling at me, getting thrown on the floor from my mattess,and people jumping on me and hitting me I just don't feel it and I've learned to defend myself in my sleep. I'm just done with it. I need help with this. Real answers please.

    August 11, 2011 at 05:57 | Report abuse | Reply
  38. Ziad

    Sleep

    July 17, 2012 at 10:53 | Report abuse | Reply
  39. Chris

    Everyone that has posted about sleeping through things need to be checked. I've had this problem since I was a baby. I've slept through Alarm Clocks. I've slept through Earthquakes. When I was a child I went to an all night skate lock-in, and I fell asleep. Maybe 5 years old? Anyway, they put cotton balls in my ears and blew a whistle to try to wake me up, to no prevail. Sleep Apnea, in very bad cases, can cause all of this. Check out this link of people that have had the same problems.

    http://yoursleep.aasmnet.org/forums/shwmessage.aspx?forumid=1&messageid=244

    December 2, 2012 at 15:41 | Report abuse | Reply
  40. Emile Shanks

    Derivatives of the EEG technique include evoked potentials (EP), which involves averaging the EEG activity time-locked to the presentation of a stimulus of some sort (visual, somatosensory, or auditory). Event-related potentials (ERPs) refer to averaged EEG responses that are time-locked to more complex processing of stimuli;^-"

    Enjoy your day
    http://livinghealthybulletin.comlm

    June 20, 2013 at 07:13 | Report abuse | Reply
  41. UFQuack

    Does the girl in the photo usually sleep in manly positions?

    August 9, 2013 at 05:03 | Report abuse | Reply

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