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July 30th, 2010
02:49 PM ET

New flu vaccine is on the way

Anyone looking for protection against the seasonal flu may soon find it available at a doctor's office or nearby clinic.  Manufacturers have begun to ship the 2010/2011 seasonal flu shots and sprays.

Glaxo SmithKline, Sanofi-Pasteur, Novartis and MedImmune (maker of the flu spray FluMist) have announced that their flu vaccines are being shipped to distributors.

In the end, 155 million doses of flu shots and sprays should be available for the upcoming flu season, if all goes well with the manufacturing process.  On Friday, Sanofi Pasteur announced that the first of more than 70 million doses of vaccine have been shipped and GSK plans to supply more than 30 million doses of vaccine.  Novartis said Thurday that  it plans to ship about 40 million flu shots and MedImmune began shipping  it's first of 15 million sprays on July 21.

More vaccine should be needed this year because the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is recommending for the first time that everyone 6 months and older should get a seasonal flu vaccination.  The CDC announced Thursday that is was adopting the recommendations of its vaccine advisory group from earlier this year.

A year ago at this time, flu activity was unusually high for the time of the year because of the spread of  new H1N1 strain.  This summer, the CDC says the number of flu cases is low.  Making vaccine available sooner should help people get protected long before the flu season actually begins to pick up again.

CDC spokesman Tom Skinner suggests that  if vaccine is available earlier people should try to get it. “We want people to get vaccinated, so if vaccine is going out and people can get it, then get it,” Skinner tells CNN.  He says there's no harm in getting a flu shot now rather than waiting until the fall, when people are used to getting their flu shots because “we know the vaccine is effective for 6-8 months, which should take you well into April of next year.”

Flu shots and sprays for the upcoming flu season will include the 2009 H1N1 strain, better known as swine flu, as one of the 3 strains included in the vaccine.

Last year the flu season peaked in October due to the emergence of the new pandemic flu strain, which was responsible for virtually all flu illness last year.  The CDC estimates that by the end of the 2009/2010 flu season at least 60 million people or about 20 percent of U.S. population had gotten sick from the new flu strain.  More people sought medical attention for flu-like symptoms during the H1N1 flu pandemic than almost any season since the CDC started reporting these numbers in 1997, according the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Only the 2003 – 2004 season could match last year's number of doctor visits.

CNN's Saundra Young, Leslie Wade and Intern Carrie Gann contributed to this report.


soundoff (299 Responses)
  1. Momo

    I weep for humanity after reading the comments here. Science-based medicine is your friend, people. *sigh*

    July 31, 2010 at 12:17 | Report abuse | Reply
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      No kidding. One can only hope these nitwits are sterile.

      July 31, 2010 at 23:18 | Report abuse |
    • SteveM

      Me too, it saddens me that there are so many stupid ignorant people like you in the world that are breeding.....

      August 1, 2010 at 07:53 | Report abuse |
    • SteveM

      Oh...duh, sorry, I misread your post and thought you were one of the nitwits. My apologies.

      August 1, 2010 at 07:54 | Report abuse |
    • Jeff

      The real idiot is YOU and those who believe everything you hear simply because they tack the words 'studies show' onto it. Are you really that naive as to understand that they skew things ON PURPOSE in order to discredit a particular group? They can make you believe anything with just the right wording or skewed peer group or anything really. You have to a bonified moron to not recognize that MONEY is the driving force behind ALL DRUG COMPANIES. They will do anything and everything to discredit reputable scientists that actually want to help people. Go ahead and get vaccinated. I could care less if you die from it anyways.

      August 2, 2010 at 17:38 | Report abuse |
  2. Huyie

    Improvements in living conditions, nutrition and other public health measures, influenza death rates substantially declined across the 20th century. There was an 18-fold decrease in influenza deaths between the 1940s and 1990s, a trend that began far before the introduction of widespread vaccination.

    Source: http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2008/pandemic-0411.html

    July 31, 2010 at 12:50 | Report abuse | Reply
  3. Barbara

    After reading all these comments I can tell who watches all these stupid reality shows onTV. You all have a choice, except the people in the Health Field. So do what you feel is right for you, but don't complain if you get sick, and don't tell others what to do. And for your sake, get a life!. The vaccine will be out there. Take it or leave it. Who cares?

    July 31, 2010 at 13:23 | Report abuse | Reply
  4. Dr Bill Toth

    Has anybody ever asked why flu season comes the same time every year? or why last year it decided to come early?
    or why they stopped naming each season flu after other countries? Just curious.
    Live with Intention,
    DrBillToth.com/blog

    July 31, 2010 at 14:12 | Report abuse | Reply
  5. BB

    I personally have never had the flu so therefore I never considered getthing the flu shot. My kids are they same way but yet they rarely get sick. Other than the occasional runny nose here and there. The thing I find interesting is that when this whole H1N1 was getting everyone sick I had a friend that got it and you know what the hospital told her. Go home, take some thera flu and stay away from people for a few days. After 5 days she was alot better and after 10 days she was fine. I think it honestely has something to do with how our bodies fight off infections. Have you ever noticed how some people like my friend get the flu and are fine after resting and yet some are hospitalized from it. With that said I have no intention of getting a flu shot cause I see no need for it and I will not let the media or doctors scare me into it. Everyones arguing that those that take it are dumb and those that dont take it are dumb. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion.

    July 31, 2010 at 14:25 | Report abuse | Reply
    • SteveM

      You are extremely lucky, you obviously have a superior immune system. People who don't should be vaccinated.

      August 1, 2010 at 07:52 | Report abuse |
  6. Anita

    Rumors are rumors and I will not let rumors prevent me from anything. I take risks all the time. I have to eat, I have to drive (in middle America, at least), I risk getting mugged or shot, I may fall in the shower – oh, that is right, a drug may just have a bad effect, including death. Every for-profit company in a capitalistic country has a goal of making money – oh, what happens if they don't? They eventually go out of business (government bailout or not). I am going to eat at McDonalds and I am going to use medication. Yes, there is a risk if I take a flu shot. Yes, the shot has been shown to not be effective 100% all of the time (that is, for all flu strains). And if some risk ends up hurting me, I won't sue (I am a lawyer, yet believe you shouldn't sue for everything that happens in life).

    July 31, 2010 at 14:30 | Report abuse | Reply
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      Anita, yours is one of the few intelligent posts here.

      July 31, 2010 at 15:33 | Report abuse |
    • corporate propaganda

      baaahhhh baaahhhhh baaahhhhh baaahhhhh listen... I understand why you think the way you do,but your thinking has been fabricated by a very real pop culture which has by design limited your capacity to critically think, especially outside the box. we only honor information as fact when it achieves a 'group consensus' now as logical as that may be, it allows certain agendas to unfold in which our best judgements can seem flawed.

      July 31, 2010 at 16:56 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      @ corp: your posts are idiot, senseless and full of misinformation. Go ahead and die of the flu. No one needs your genetic contribution to mankind. There are already plenty of idjits like you.

      July 31, 2010 at 19:45 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      Just because I watch alot of reality television and trust in commercials does not mean I am not a critical thinker. I love to read fashion magazines and I ALWAYS criticize the beautiful women I see on there. People say I have an unhealthy jealousy towards women. I cant help being 350lbs. I love fast food too much. But I know those women all get plastic surgery...

      August 2, 2010 at 17:44 | Report abuse |
  7. Chip

    you do realize that every vaccine has to be stronger than the last, because we are creating in our own bodies a super strain of flu and they continue to get stronger as we get weaker to the strain we created.. unfortunately we need to allow nature to run its course or we are gonna get a backlash.. our fear of death is killing us.. as you are so once was i; as i am one day you will be, so prepare for death and follow me.

    July 31, 2010 at 15:40 | Report abuse | Reply
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      I beg to differ. There are different strains of flu that require a different vaccine; that doesn't mean each strain is stronger than the one before. Where did you come up with that idea?

      July 31, 2010 at 16:29 | Report abuse |
    • SteveM

      Do you have a degree in biology? Are you a doctor? A research chemist? Where did you get that ignorant nonsense??

      August 1, 2010 at 07:46 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      Like most of the tripe here, it came from pulledoutofhisass . com

      August 1, 2010 at 17:44 | Report abuse |
  8. Annexian

    Poison.

    Poison the NWO is preparing for us, to "Cull" the population.
    Check out David Icke.

    July 31, 2010 at 16:21 | Report abuse | Reply
    • IggyDad

      Warning: Kook alert level at Orange.

      July 31, 2010 at 18:43 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      That's why I would hope these imbeciles take their own advice and don't get vaccinated. Maybe there will be fewer of them in the future.

      July 31, 2010 at 19:51 | Report abuse |
    • OlJim

      nonovyerbeezwax:
      That is why – you are the first one to go! No one here is trying to prevent you from poisoning yourself, soo foolish!

      July 31, 2010 at 22:33 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      OIJim, please, don't have kids. You owe it to the universe to limit your contribution to one generation.

      Idjit.

      July 31, 2010 at 23:20 | Report abuse |
    • SteveM

      Were you born stupid or did your mom drop you on your head when you were a baby?

      August 1, 2010 at 07:45 | Report abuse |
    • OlJim

      I wish that you could only love yourself a little bit more, otherwise you would not post such aggressive and hateful posts. It really shows how you are, a brainless animal.

      August 1, 2010 at 10:05 | Report abuse |
  9. EternalLove

    A good perspective on vaccines is Dr.Tenpenny.com
    I also respect another comment earlier that the H1N1 flu is "almost never verified by lab results".
    It is not about convincing the other party who is correct but being grateful that I still have a choice that I do not have to take this vaccine.

    July 31, 2010 at 20:59 | Report abuse | Reply
  10. Kariff

    During the school year at Thomasdale supposable we had some cases break out to the point where if one more happened they'd close, it never happened personally I never needed the shots and I'll continue to keep it that way.

    July 31, 2010 at 21:51 | Report abuse | Reply
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      Ahhahhahahhaaaaaa! Supposable? SUPPOSABLE???? Really? You think that's the word you want to use?

      Some of you dolts need a vaccination for dumb disease.

      July 31, 2010 at 23:21 | Report abuse |
  11. ashley24

    I'm a RN, getting the shot is beneficial to me.

    August 1, 2010 at 01:44 | Report abuse | Reply
  12. SteveM

    People who don't get flu shots are stupid and deserve to get the flu. I've gotten one every year for the past 10 years and I haven't had the flu in 10 years. They work, they won't give you the flu, period. If you don't get one you deserve to get the flu.

    August 1, 2010 at 07:42 | Report abuse | Reply
    • IggyDad

      Shawn, dId you read this patent application? It is for an ATTENUATED virus (that means weakened). That's what they use in VACCINES. So the horror is that scientists have been researching strategies to cope with a serious flu epidemic?????

      August 1, 2010 at 07:48 | Report abuse |
    • SteveM

      Shawn?? Who is Shawn? And what a totally ignorant comment that makes no sense at all. If you can't even make a little bit of sense with your post, don't post. Moron.

      August 1, 2010 at 07:50 | Report abuse |
    • OlJim

      SteveM needs to see psychiatrist

      August 1, 2010 at 10:06 | Report abuse |
    • SteveM

      OlJim needs to get a brain.

      August 1, 2010 at 10:25 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      You're right, Steve. OIJim is an ignoramus who thinks he's healthy because he doesn't go to the doctor any more and never gets a flu shot.

      What a dolt.

      August 1, 2010 at 12:22 | Report abuse |
    • L in Seattle

      Getting the stupid shot MADE me sick last year!! I was fine before then.

      August 2, 2010 at 03:00 | Report abuse |
  13. The_Mick

    I spent three decades teaching in the largest high school in Maryland – with no windows and germ-filled air recirculating continuously. Despite the fact I had Achilles Tendon, two Sinus, and Rotator Cuff operations, I retired with over 90% of my sick days unused. How? I think it has to do with getting my flu shot every year. While fellow teachers were home sick for a week, I was helping out their substitutes.

    It supposedly has a 65% success rate (it only protects against the three strains of flu they think will be most threatening in the coming season), so it's not perfect and if it was very expensive for me, I might pass, but I get it free through my BCBS insurance. Additionally, many county health departments give it free or ask for a small donation ($20 in my county surrounding Annapolis, MD). So get your shot – there's less mercury, in a less-absorbable form, than in 10 oz. of tuna.

    August 1, 2010 at 10:12 | Report abuse | Reply
  14. SteveM

    Actually, I'm glad for all the stupid morons who think vaccines are bad. That means more for the intelligent people! And if some of the morons die of the flu, then they won't pass their moron genes on to another generation. It's a win win situation!

    August 1, 2010 at 10:26 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Jer

      Yes. Because nobody survived the flu before flue shots, Mr. Smart Guy.

      August 1, 2010 at 23:06 | Report abuse |
  15. Clark Thomas

    Fact: As much money in six months is spent on Lipitor alone, which is just one of many statins, as is spent on ALL the vaccines in TWELVE months around the world. We "civilized" people are the real agents of Big Pharm, because we do so many stupid things to our bodies, that subsequently allow Big Pharm to make megabucks on annuity medications to treat but not cure us. Isn't it preferable (but not nearly as profitable) to prevent a disease in the first place?

    August 1, 2010 at 11:42 | Report abuse | Reply
  16. One1

    I wouldn't be supprised if the pandemic was nothing more than a "social experiment" to guage the to response and decisions of the masses. They probably have a good idea now on what the census is in response to "pandemic" situations and "vaccine" acceptance.

    August 1, 2010 at 11:42 | Report abuse | Reply
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      I wouldn't be surprised to find out you live in a trailer with aluminum foil covering every window.

      August 1, 2010 at 13:16 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      No offense to anyone living in a trailer. I actually live in one too. I live with my mom actually and her 35 cats. So, I don't knock people in trailers. People call me trailer trash so I know how that prejudice feels.

      August 2, 2010 at 18:11 | Report abuse |
  17. nonovyerbeezwax

    Those nimrods who think vaccines are "poisonous" and "full of CHEMICALS" are simply ignorant. Everything is full of chemicals, doofuses. Chemicals are the fabric of all things. And the nonsensical belief that the vaccines are "poisonous" is just that–nonsensical. These vaccines aren't mixed up in somebody's bathroom in a vat full of eye of newt and tongue of toad, ya morons. They're developed by scientists who have had years of experience and worked for decades, sometimes, to find ways to prevent devastating diseases from killing or disabling people.

    Get an education beyond high school. Read something besides the National Enquirer, Listen to someone more knowledgeable than Rush and Beck.

    Otherwise, you deserve your fate.

    August 1, 2010 at 12:28 | Report abuse | Reply
    • InfoWarrior

      http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Health–Science/Science/Virus-mix-up-by-lab-could-have-resulted-in-pandemic/articleshow/4230882.cms

      This is an article about how Baxter Pharmaceuticals, sent out vaccines to 18 countries that were contaimenated by the deadly H5N1. Luckily, before it was given to people, a doctor in the Czech Republic tested it for ferrets. All the ferrets were killed and an investigation was started. When first questioned Baxter tried to cover itself by claiming "trade secrets". Afterwards they that pure H5N1 batches were sent accidentally. Now when you mix H5N1 with H3N2(seasonal flu viruses), you create something that is very lethal and very easily spread.

      Then after Baxter was trying to push its swine flu vaccine, the Czech Republic refused to take batches coming from them. In the words of the Deputy Health Minister, Marek Snajdr, the vaccine "may have side effects and it may even cause death if used."

      August 1, 2010 at 15:25 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      And a rare incident in which no one even got sick is important why? There are so many "ifs" in the article, one wonders why anyone even bothered.

      August 1, 2010 at 17:43 | Report abuse |
    • SteveM

      @ Info Warrior: Wow. I read that article. You really know your stuff. As I said before, it's that time of the month and I am really in a bad mood. It's easier for me to just yell at people online because I am really shy on person. It has to do with my having low self esteem but I am seeing a psychiatrist to work on that.

      August 2, 2010 at 17:52 | Report abuse |
  18. JuStAnObSeRvAtIoN

    Reading over the post that some of you have left is hilarious.......Your arguing about something you have no control whatsoever over........Quit being a bunch of little sissy girls and grow the freak up..........Either get the vaccinations or don't......Noone wants to hear about how you think you know so much about it.........I am amazed how stupid most of the people in this world are by the way they argue over nonsense.............Get a life you bunch of losers........LOL......I say get a life but none of you will.......You'll post back about how I am ignorant and your so smart......LOL......You can't bring the man down.......LOL...........

    August 1, 2010 at 14:38 | Report abuse | Reply
    • SteveM

      Oh yeah, real intelligent post there Bubba. If posting here is stupid then you must be a complete imbecile. Get a brain.

      August 1, 2010 at 15:13 | Report abuse |
    • SteveM

      Sorry its imbocile. Man, my spelling is horrible.. well my reading comprehension is too but I don't wanna go into dat!

      August 2, 2010 at 17:49 | Report abuse |
  19. Stuart

    The absurd flu hype by the feds and Big Pharma is bad enough. Consider too that Thimerisol (the mercury based preservative) is still being used in the flu vaccines, together with an aluminum component. Ask to check the label before you get injected. Aluminum is one of the suspect elements in Alzheimers.

    August 1, 2010 at 20:59 | Report abuse | Reply
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      Thimerosal is not harmful.

      August 3, 2010 at 08:17 | Report abuse |
  20. Rick

    Amazing, people, how many can show so little intelligence. I'll pray for you; you must may need it.

    August 1, 2010 at 22:25 | Report abuse | Reply
  21. Bill

    Never have, never will!

    August 2, 2010 at 06:43 | Report abuse | Reply
  22. Bill

    Thanks to the good number of people still taking the flu shot, so that it won't become mandatory for the rest of us!

    August 2, 2010 at 07:00 | Report abuse | Reply
  23. Paul M

    After serving in the Army for 7 years from 79 to 86 and being required to take the flu shot, I decided that it was not necessary. 5 years later I was working at the Miami Military Entrance Processing Station and one of my co-workers came in sick with the flu and I caught it. That night I woke up with every muscle in my body screaming with pain. It was the worst pain that I had ever felt in my life, ever worse than when I broke my femur. From that year forward I have gotten my flu shot because I never wish to experience pain like that again.

    August 2, 2010 at 08:23 | Report abuse | Reply
  24. Pete Larson

    The incredible ignorance of health, medicine, influenza and vaccines displayed within a large number of these comments is staggering.

    August 2, 2010 at 08:47 | Report abuse | Reply
  25. Heather

    I have never had a flu shot before, but I do believe I will get one this year. Not only am I pregnant, but I am also about to start my first year of teaching. I would rather be safe than sorry.

    August 2, 2010 at 09:27 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Fuyuko

      Yeah, they are necessary if you work at a school. A shot can make a big difference in how long you are out sick and prevent you from eating up your sick leave.

      August 2, 2010 at 12:11 | Report abuse |
    • Valerie

      Don't get it. That mercury will go straight to your baby and he/she could have all kinds of mental defects including autism. Just say no to your doctor! :)

      August 2, 2010 at 13:56 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      Valerie, this simply false. There is no link between Thimerosal and autism. Stop passing on blatant misinformation.

      August 3, 2010 at 16:50 | Report abuse |
    • Valerie

      nonovyerbeezwax (/notation), There is no proof that you are an overweight recovering alcoholic who has horrible credit, a non-existent love life, is on the rag, will do whatever a doctor tells you to do even if that means to drink bleach, does not think critically, works for a drug company, watches reality television shows, trusts in what commercials are selling to you, reads fashion magazines in order to criticize the people within, lives in a trailer with your mother and her 35 cats, and is seeing a psychiatrist. And yet you expect us to take your word for it.

      There is however, proof that you are a naïve, narcissistic bully who suffers from low self esteem and takes it out on others on multiple CNN comment forums. There is also proof that you consider yourself the grammar and spelling police on everyone except yourself and that you like to quote Robert A. Heinlein. You seem pretty miserable. Maybe it is because you get the flu shot.

      August 4, 2010 at 15:36 | Report abuse |
  26. Joe

    If you don't get a flu shot, you're stupid. Period. You deserve to get the flu.

    August 2, 2010 at 09:29 | Report abuse | Reply
  27. Huyie

    One of the things the CDC did was to encourage the belief that influenza infection can 'occur among people for whom influenza is not generally perceived to cause serious complications (e.g., children, healthy adults, healthy seniors).' In other words, promote flu vaccination to those who don’t really need it.

    http://www.examiner.com/x-10438-Human-Rights-Examiner~y2009m10d10-Mindbehavior-control-dupes-doctors-and-public-to-buy-vaccine

    August 2, 2010 at 10:36 | Report abuse | Reply
    • DUH

      Exactly. That was one of the OBVIOUS red flags that popped up for me. Now us in our 20's and 30's are high risk? Based on WHAT? What a crock. All of you who get the flu shot deserve to die from it.

      August 2, 2010 at 17:47 | Report abuse |
  28. Fuyuko

    I work at a school and I can't wait to get this. Flu shots make a difference in how often I get sick. Fall is the biggest time of year for the flu, here.

    August 2, 2010 at 12:08 | Report abuse | Reply
  29. yuanqi

    Ignorance is bliss. Right Shawn?? Do you even know how to use google. LOL There is soooo much ignorance in this country. I am surprised people can even find there way home from work. Walking around in a stupor is what 99% of this country is doing. Just blinded by ignorance, and unfortunately it is one thing I have learned that cannot be overcome. A country almost full of dumba**es. I am sure there will be post from the PEANUT GALLERY that will comment on mine and we will get to see even more ignorance displayed. LOL

    August 2, 2010 at 12:21 | Report abuse | Reply
  30. Jen8675309

    I have only had the flu shot once and that was the only year that I have been sick with the flu since I can remember. And I am a diabetic so I am "supposed" to have the shot...but I CHOOSE not to. That's right, I CHOOSE not to. But I do CHOOSE to eat healthy, take vitamins (the gummy ones because they taste the best lol), and lead a healthy life which I believe helps me stay healthy. And I think the H1N1 stuff is/was a bunch of BS. More people have died from the regular flu than H1N1 and you don't see anyone calling influenza an epidemic.

    And no...I am not a doctor, nurse, someone in the medical field; I am just a 29 year old stating my opinion. If you don't like it, well, then I don't like yours either lol.

    August 2, 2010 at 12:42 | Report abuse | Reply
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      And you're an idiot. You forgot to add that little tidbit of info. Frankly, I couldn't care less if you get yourself immunized or not. You probably have a low-level occupation and your absence from work for two or three weeks wouldn't be noticed anyway.

      August 2, 2010 at 22:16 | Report abuse |
  31. D

    I never get sick, but then again, I get the shots.

    August 2, 2010 at 12:44 | Report abuse | Reply
  32. Valerie

    Supposedly they took Thimerosal out of our children's vaccines (I would still physically check the labels if I were you, because some people would say that it is still in them at this very moment), however there is still some in the Flu Vaccine. That's Ethyl Mercury. That would go through the umbilical cord to my baby. Every time I go to the doctor there are signs posted to make sure to ask your doctor for a flu shot. No thanks.

    In my opinion, the only thing worth vaccinating against is meningitis. That is, if vaccines even work, considering it has not been conclusively proven that they do.

    August 2, 2010 at 13:53 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Pete Larson

      There is plenty of evidence out there to suggest that vaccines work. For example, have your children ever had measles? Have you? If you aren't over the age of 35, I doubt you have. Tetanus. Varicella, polio, Hep A, Hep B, there's a litany of successful vaccines.

      August 2, 2010 at 22:09 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      Pete, you're absolutely right. The hysterics who claim that vaccines are "evil" and more dangerous than the diseases they can prevent are ill-informed, ignorant dolts who spend more time viewing Fox News and reading mothering.com than is good for them.

      August 2, 2010 at 22:14 | Report abuse |
    • InfoWarrior

      Pete and nonovyerbeezwax, I don't really watch Fox News so I don't know what they say on the issue but I know what the University of Pittsburgh has just concluded:
      http://www.ageofautism.com/2010/07/new-study-shows-vaccines-cause-brain-changes-found-in-autism.html

      This study was completed mid-July.
      It was also printed in, Acta Neurobiologiae Experimentalis.

      August 2, 2010 at 23:48 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      @info: you're linking a newsletter that's full of hysteria and misinformation. But go right ahead and keep spamming.

      August 3, 2010 at 08:20 | Report abuse |
    • Valerie

      Not getting a disease is hardly proof that a vaccination worked. Most of the diseases that were 'eradicated' by vaccination were already in decline before the vaccines were invented, but undoubtedly doctors credit vaccines for the miraculous decline. Not to mention that other countries who did not widely use the same vaccines also had the same rates of decline. It would seem that our society has become much cleaner and healthier since the mid 1800s, and that could also be the reason. And calling people names doesn't help inform them of anything. We are all predisposed to believe what we want to believe.

      Another thing. The hospital is going to try to innoculate my baby against Hepatitis B right after it is born. There is no reason for a baby to get that shot if it wasn't born to a mother who has it or doesn't live in a region where it is rampant, and they could easily test me for it rather than just sticking a needle in my baby.

      August 3, 2010 at 12:31 | Report abuse |
    • TuneIn

      How do you explain the fact that polio is rampant in some countries in Africa where the populace refuses to be vaccinated because people believe the vaccine will render then infertile?

      August 3, 2010 at 15:43 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      Thimerosal has already been proven to be a very effective preservative for vaccines and there is no link between its use and autism. The only reason it was removed was because of the flawed studies and the overreaction to them.

      It is absurd to think that vaccines "don't work".

      August 3, 2010 at 16:49 | Report abuse |
    • Valerie

      nonovyerbeezwax, funny, that's exactly what it says on Wikipedia. I'm not buying it, though. Any form of Mercury (in this case Thimerosal which distributes Ethylmercury once inside the body) that crosses the blood brain barrier, targeting the kidneys, brain and central nervous system is off limits to myself being pregnant or my child once it's born. I'm still on the fence as to whether or not vaccines reap more rewards than risk.

      There must be some reason you chose this article to make 200 comments on. Something about vaccines has struck a nerve that you feel you must communicate to people the 'truth'. No one has all the answers, but the best thing we can all do as an intelligent species is to ask more questions. Never take Authority or Mother Culture at its word that everything they do is in your best interest, because, generally speaking, it's not. That means government, doctors, and anyone you know. We are all prone to human error no matter our degrees, affiliations, or level of intelligence.

      August 3, 2010 at 18:33 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      What 'strikes a nerve' is the rampant ignorance and stupidity you and others like you exhibit on blogs like these. You are simply wrong on the subject of Thimerosal; every objective study has shown that it's harmless and yet you choose to go one acting as though you actually have an ounce of real understanding of scientific research. You'd rather believe some nutty conspiracy theory. It's much easier and you'll wow all your friends at the pool with your horror stories of what vaccines will do.

      Read a few of Stan's comments early on in this discussion. You're as gullible and deluded as the nuts he responds to.

      But go ahead. Get the flu while you're pregnant. Don't vaccinate your kid. I don't give a rat's butt about your health or your kid's. I never try to teach a pig to sing. It wastes my time and annoys the pig.

      August 3, 2010 at 21:25 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      Of course, kooks will dismiss anything that doesn't conform to their conspiracy fantasies but these are the facts on Thimerosal:

      Three leading federal agencies (CDC, FDA, and NIH) have reviewed the published research on thimerosal and found it to be a safe product to use in vaccines. Three independent organizations [The National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)] reviewed the published research and also found thimerosal to be a safe product to use in vaccines. The scientific community supports the use of thimerosal in influenza vaccines.

      August 4, 2010 at 08:45 | Report abuse |
    • Valerie

      Thimerosal has not been proven to be safe by any organization without bias, there is much research still needing to be done. The organizations you list are corrupt to the core. The FDA approves drug after drug only to hold hearings after it kills enough people as to whether they may or may not take it off the market. The former director of the CDC, Julie Gerberding left in 2009 to become the head of vaccines at Merck. I could go on and on. Given, they were not always this way.

      The only ones displaying ignorance in this comments section are the people who choose to trust in the establishment without asking any questions. Witty comebacks do not equate with critical thought.

      August 4, 2010 at 12:31 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      More paranoid nonsense. So a government official leaves her post and goes to work for a commercial enterprise in her field of expertise? Do you have a clue, lady? People do this all the time. There's nothing "fishy" about it, and your attempts to paint it as a sign of corruption and deceit are pathetic, like every post you've made. You have absolutely no credible evidence whatever that there is any sort of widespread or systematic conspiracy between the FDA or the CDC and the drug manufacturers. None. You spout this crap without any basis in fact. The opinions you're spewing are simply the sort of ridiculous pap one can read on mothering.com and blogs in which any yahoo can write. You seem to think I don't ask questions and simply take what the authorities say at face value-which isn't the case at all.

      I'm just not some poorly educated, gullible fool who believes everything i hear on Fox News or read on some blog. I believe the studies that are performed by scientists and doctors, not superstitions and misinformation posted by people like you, who have no science background and no experience in the area of medicine.

      August 4, 2010 at 17:42 | Report abuse |
    • Valerie

      Again... nonovyerbeezwax (/notation), There is no proof that you are an overweight recovering alcoholic who has horrible credit, a non-existent love life, is on the rag, will do whatever a doctor tells you to do even if that means to drink bleach, does not think critically, works for a drug company, watches reality television shows, trusts in what commercials are selling to you, reads fashion magazines in order to criticize the people within, lives in a trailer with your mother and her 35 cats, and is seeing a psychiatrist. And yet you expect us to take your word for it.

      There is however, proof that you are a naïve, narcissistic bully who suffers from low self esteem and takes it out on others on multiple CNN comment forums. There is also proof that you consider yourself the grammar and spelling police on everyone except yourself and that you like to quote Robert A. Heinlein. You seem pretty miserable. Maybe it is because you get the flu shot.

      August 4, 2010 at 18:15 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      Oh, boo-hoo, poor baby. Get out of the kitchen if you can't take the heat. You can't refute one thing I've posted and that's what really gripes your azz. Too bad, so sad.

      August 4, 2010 at 18:52 | Report abuse |
  33. nonovyerbeezwax

    @ Steve M: Caught you, Einstein. You forgot to change your "Name" and used your own by mistake. Good job, doofus.

    August 2, 2010 at 19:46 | Report abuse | Reply
  34. Huyie

    The CDC has recommended in the United States, that everyone six months of age and over to be vaccinated against the flu this fall. The vaccine has been recommended even though it has still not been possible to identify a biological or other basis that would explain the higher than expected observed rates of fever and febrile convulsions in children five and under in Australia.

    August 2, 2010 at 22:02 | Report abuse | Reply
    • InfoWarrior

      I'm not sure where you got your information but the Telegraph posted this recently:
      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/7918351/Flu-jab-linked-to-fits-in-under-fives-officials.html

      Basically children under five who receive the seasonal flu jab have a higher rate of convulsions.

      August 2, 2010 at 23:53 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      There is risk in every human activity. If you don't care about being sick as a dog for two weeks and under the weather for another week or so, and don't care if your kid gets the flu, oh, well. It's a free country. Go ahead and don't bother getting your kids vaccinated for measles. Or mumps. After all, they'll probably be just fine. While you're at it, forgo the polio vaccine. After all. if they get it, living in an iron lung's not so bad.

      August 3, 2010 at 08:28 | Report abuse |
  35. Huyie

    Two other flu vaccines for children were used in Australia, Influvac, made by Solvay Biologicals, and Vaxigrip, made by Sanofi Pasteur, but too few doses of them have been administered to accurately determine if they are linked to similar rates of fever and convulsion. Let the experiment begin!

    http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/influenza/general/news/jun0110csl-br.html

    August 3, 2010 at 09:30 | Report abuse | Reply
  36. Huyie

    "Chopra points out that vaccination did successfully eradicate smallpox. The possibility of eradicating polio in the same way is open to scientific debate. However he also observes that all the other childhood diseases have been unsuccessfully fought with vaccination campaigns involving millions of children every year. Worst of all, these diseases are appearing with increasing frequency in the very populations that have been vaccinated for several generations."

    http://www.vitalitymagazine.com/apr_08_helke

    August 3, 2010 at 09:50 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Lou

      No we did not get rid of smallpox. Smallpox has been removed from the human herd and sequestered in bio-labs all over the world as a potential bio-weapon of great destructive power. As the population with NO antibodies for smallpox grows so too does the bio-labs smallpox "samples" grow as potential bio-weapons. The Russians at one time had something like 3,000 gallons of smallpox. Don't laugh we had MORE, MUCH more.

      Mankind at its finest. War uber alles.

      September 18, 2010 at 17:09 | Report abuse |
  37. Dr. Ann

    There is a relationship between Autism and Aspartame. The Senate is determining what correlates with Autism. For the Senate Hearing on Autism going on this month, it may be beneficial to know that along with Mercury and other contaminations in the environment, Aspartame (NutraSweet and Equal) has also been linked to Autism.

    If you email me back and ask for the information I have, I can show you a chart that significantly matches Autism rates with Aspartame use rate. Europe has banned the use of Aspartame for pregnant and nursing women as well as children. The countries where Aspartame has been banned or never accepted, their Autism rate is only a small fraction of the U.S. rate. Since Aspartame has been approved in 1981, and placed in soft drinks in 1986, the Autism rate has skyrocketed. The Aspartame notes page explains just a few studies on how Aspartame has been linked with brain disorders.

    Some Main Points:

    Dr. Olney warned of the damage that this product would do to the unborn and to children. He said that the FDA acknowledged “aspartame had been shown to induce brain damage in neonatal animals” but FDA dismissed the neurotoxicity as irrelevant on grounds that the approved uses of aspartame don’t include feeding it to newborn humans. Yet aspartame can be found in prescription and over-the-counter pediatric drugs and in pediatric vitamins. Nursing babies receive this poison from mothers who breastfeed. The recent plague of Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), autism, and birth defects manifest the neurologic devastations of aspartame. Supporting this view, Dr. Louis Elsas, Emory Professor of Pediatrics and Genetics, testified in a congressional hearing that aspartame is a teratogen (causes birth defects) and a neurotoxin.

    Aspartame is a teratogen that triggers birth defects. It is a deadly neurotoxin (Dr. Louis Elsas testimony before congress, pediatric professor,genetics, Emory, http://www.dorway.com). Neurosurgeon Russell Blaylock, M.D. says in his book that aspartame triggers ADD and autism.

    August 4, 2010 at 11:20 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Valerie

      I don't doubt that it would cause some type of defects in an unborn child. It's amazing that it ever became legal.

      August 4, 2010 at 12:33 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      Yeah, right. Did you even click on the link, Valerie? It doesn't work. So much for your informed opinion.

      August 4, 2010 at 17:45 | Report abuse |
  38. nonovyerbeezwax

    Here, Valerie, since you so value Wikipedia: Russell L. Blaylock, MD is a retired neurosurgeon and author. He is a former clinical assistant professor of neurosurgery at the University of Mississippi Medical Center and is currently a visiting professor in the biology department at Belhaven College.[1] He is the author of a number of books and papers, including Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills (1994), Health and Nutrition Secrets That Can Save Your Life (2002), and Natural Strategies for Cancer Patients (2003), and writes a monthly newsletter, the Blaylock Wellness Report.
    Blaylock has endorsed views inconsistent with the scientific consensus, including that food additives such as aspartame and monosodium glutamate (MSG) are excitotoxic in normal doses and that the H1N1 influenza (swine flu) vaccine carries more risk than swine flu itself.[2][3][4]

    August 4, 2010 at 17:50 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Valerie

      You have fun wih that. Real critical thinking always involves looking things up online and posting links to make your point. Because wikipedia and everything online is 100% true. I'm done with you for now, Troll.

      August 4, 2010 at 18:19 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      The only troll here is you, whoever you are. If you were Valerie, you would recall that you were the one who looked up information on Wikipedia earlier. But of course, you're not Valerie, you're a pus-faced teenager who just got home from his remedial reading class.

      Nice try, bozo. Even Valerie writes better than you do.

      August 4, 2010 at 18:44 | Report abuse |
    • Valerie

      notation/nonovyerbeezwax, My comment on Wikipedia was in reference to you saying, "You are simply wrong on the subject of Thimerosal; every objective study has shown that it's harmless and yet you choose to go one acting as though you actually have an ounce of real understanding of scientific research." You get your info from Wikipedia or some other internet source and you claim it as absolute undisputed proof. You are not interested in debate, in sharing experience, only in putting other people down and calling names. You are an emotional toddler. Perhaps one day you will get out of the trailer park and converse with real people who have empathy for one another and also exhibit reasonable doubt at the establishment. I'm sure I will run into you again, I love to read the comments on all of health and vaccination articles. Goodbye for now. :)

      August 4, 2010 at 19:15 | Report abuse |
    • nonovyerbeezwax

      Valerie, you're the one who referred to Wikipedia, not I. I base my opinion on science/medical websites. You said you checked Wikipedia and that it backed up what I said.

      You can call me whatever you like, dear. I'm not interested in your psychoanalysis, since you don't have a degree in it and aren't qualified. You are simply angry that I don't swallow your simple-minded ideas about vaccines, and actually have reliable sources to back up what I say. You don't. Not my problem.

      August 4, 2010 at 19:29 | Report abuse |
    • Valerie

      What exactscience/medical websites and what gives you the credentials to comment on the legitimacy of them? The only websites you've referenced, since you believe that they contain the answers to vaccine safety, are Snopes and Quackwatch, hardly the most accurate medical and scientific websites on vaccine safety. What qualifications do you have to make any type of assessment of vaccine safety?

      If each vaccine didn't come with many risks, there wouldn't be a controversy. Why do you think they hand out those colorful flyers in pediatricians offices when they are about to give your kid a shot? Here's a website for you: http://vaers.hhs.gov/index

      August 5, 2010 at 07:26 | Report abuse |
  39. nonovyerbeezwax

    Try looking up Russell Blaylock on Snopes.com, Valerie. Also check the website Quackwatch.

    Educate yourself.

    August 4, 2010 at 17:51 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Lou

      Snopes.com and quackwatch BOTH belong on a list of KNOWN propaganda sites. Quackwatch is a captive of big pharma and has never met a toxic drug it does not like. Things like apples can be very dangerous however.

      Please think for yourself and do not trust sites purporting to alert you to quacks.

      September 17, 2010 at 21:27 | Report abuse |
  40. nonovyerbeezwax

    http://www.snopes.com/medical/toxins/aspartame.asp

    August 4, 2010 at 18:01 | Report abuse | Reply
  41. nonovyerbeezwax

    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2009/jan/26/study-backs-thimerosal-safety/

    August 4, 2010 at 18:48 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Valerie

      Not only is this article written by someone who works for The Washington Times, but it quotes Paul Offit, one of the most outspoken persons with a vested interest in seeing that everyone take their vaccines without asking questions. Horrible source to make your point.

      August 5, 2010 at 09:44 | Report abuse |
  42. nonovyerbeezwax

    http://www.immunize.org/thimerosal/

    August 4, 2010 at 18:50 | Report abuse | Reply
    • Valerie

      http://www.springerlink.com/content/mdhj0yg2fpp1wnav/

      August 5, 2010 at 10:11 | Report abuse |
  43. Valerie

    Gotta love the Kennedys! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zrIM2hwrLoc&feature=related

    August 5, 2010 at 20:28 | Report abuse | Reply
  44. Huyie

    Insufficient doses of this season’s Influvac and Vaxigrip vaccines have been used in Australian children, in this age group (five and under) to accurately determine the rates for adverse events with these vaccines. In addition, as the cause of the increase in febrile convulsions is not yet known, caution should be exercised.

    Source: http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/C8D6BEB67768E80ACA257735002424BF/$File/dept%20010610.pdf

    August 6, 2010 at 10:06 | Report abuse | Reply
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