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July 7th, 2010
04:31 PM ET

Website explains health coverage options

Confused about the health reform juggernaut that passed in March?

The government’s new website, launched this month, attempts to answer your questions. Kathleen Sebelius, secretary of Health and Human Services wrote in a note to users that it will “identify both the private and the public health coverage options available in your local community.” FULL POST


July 7th, 2010
04:23 PM ET

Dental clinics at border offer cheaper rates

A small but growing chain of full-service dental centers lining the border along California, Arizona and Texas are located in Mexico, but 97 percent of DentiCenter's patients come from the United States.

For a mere fraction of the cost, patients can get the same crowns and dental procedures, reports Eilene Zimmerman for CNNMoney.  The recession has Americans searching for savings, and that has contributed to the 20 percent increase in dental tourism a year.  For the full story, check out For cut-rate dental care, head to Mexico


July 7th, 2010
02:33 PM ET

FDA approves telescope device for eyes

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration this week approved the first implantable miniature telescope for the eye, to treat macular degeneration.

The device helps patients with end-stage, age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of severe vision loss in Americans older than 60

FULL POST


July 7th, 2010
02:25 PM ET

UN body sets global maximum melamine levels in food

Health officials from around the world have agreed to a maximum safe amount of melamine for human and animal food.

Melamine is used to make a variety of products including plastic dishes and laminates and linings of food cans.

Representatives from 130 countries agreed to the following maximum levels:  1 milligram of melamine per kilogram in powdered infant formula, (which equals 0.000035 ounces per 2.2 pounds) and 2.5 milligrams of melamine per kilogram in other foods and animal feed (0.000088 ounces per 2.2 pounds).
FULL POST


July 7th, 2010
12:15 PM ET

Remembering the 'father of geriatrics'

Dr. Robert Butler, regarded as “the father of geriatrics,” died Sunday at age 83. He had leukemia.

His accomplishments included serving as the first director of the National Institute on Aging, where he shaped the aging policy in the United States. His most recent book is "The Longevity Prescription: The 8 Proven Keys to a Long, Healthy Life."

FULL POST


July 7th, 2010
11:49 AM ET

Vet petitions to have medical pot OK'd for PTSD

Kevin Grimsinger dreads the night.  He often wakes up with searing memories of what happened years ago.  Grimsinger, 42, is a former special forces medic.  He served in Kosovo and the first Gulf War.  Grimsinger's life changed in 2001, when he stepped on a land mine in Kandahar, Afghanistan.  He lost parts of both his legs and broke his back.  But it's the injuries you can't see that he says are the worst.

"I don't sleep.  I don't eat.  When I do sleep, it is broken up because of nightmares,"  Grimsinger said during a recent conversation from his Colorado home.

FULL POST


July 7th, 2010
09:52 AM ET

Glucosamine no relief for low back pain sufferers

New research leaves more questions than answers for those with chronic low back pain.

A study released Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests glucosamine pills do not provide relief for lower back pain. The study, conducted at Oslo University Hospital in Norway, looked at 250 people over the age of 25, with chronic low back pain who also had degenerative discs in their lower backs. Researchers gave half of the patients daily doses of 1,500 miligrams of glucosamine. The other half received a placebo.

FULL POST


July 7th, 2010
09:25 AM ET

Diet cola drains calcium in women

They may contain zero calories, no sugar and provide an energy boost, but diet soda could drain calcium and phosphorous from your body, according to a preliminary study presented at a medical convention.

A small study from the Walter Reed Army Medical Center reported that healthy women who drank diet cola excrete more calcium and phosphorous than non-cola drinkers.

FULL POST


July 7th, 2010
08:44 AM ET

Don't leave your child in the car

As temperatures continue climbing in the Northeast, one deadly hazard to be aware of is leaving a child in a car.

At the end of June, 20 children had died in the United States of heat stroke in 2010, said Jan Null, a meteorologist at San Francisco State University.

FULL POST


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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.

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