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June 14th, 2010
01:09 PM ET

Kevorkian: 'I have no regrets'


"He shifted his gaze from his lawyer back to me. 'Sanjay, you want to know the single worst moment of my life?'

That wasn't the question I asked, but in fact I was curious to know the answer.

'OK,' I replied - a little uneasily.

He smiled now and said in a very deliberate, almost staccato voice: 'The single worst moment of my life... was the moment I was born.' And, we had officially begun my sit-down interview with Dr. Jack Kevorkian."

That's just part of Dr. Sanjay Gupta's interview with Kevorkian.  Gupta spent more than two hours with the infamous doctor who expressed no regrets about his life.  Read the full account here.


Filed under: Health & Politics

soundoff (13 Responses)
  1. WallStreet Prophet

    Dr. Kevorkian must be approaching enlightenment near the ned of his own life- so he speaks the truth.. The movie I don't knoiw Jakc is very good but does not do him complete justice!

    June 14, 2010 at 15:00 | Report abuse | Reply
  2. TAM

    He's SCUMBAG who tryed to play God !!!!

    June 14, 2010 at 16:41 | Report abuse | Reply
  3. ivnprt

    Thank you Doctor Kevorkian for opening my mind on a subject

    that has been hidden for too long in this country

    June 14, 2010 at 19:08 | Report abuse | Reply
  4. Mitch

    How is he a scumbag who tried to play God? Have you ever had the flu or pneumonia and had to take medicine to get better? Or had a relative with cancer who went through some kind of treatment? That, in and of itself, is playing God. We Americans base our lives and love for this country on one simple fact: we are FREE. But how can we claim to be free when we can't allow ourselves to die when we feel it is our time?? Kevorkian is one of the great civil rights leaders of our time, shame on all those who say otherwise. As for Tam, learn your grammar before you give us your likely uninformed opinion.

    June 15, 2010 at 02:30 | Report abuse | Reply
  5. Mark

    When is assisted suicide not murder? Isn't it just another way of politically correctness in order to make the subject easier to deal with a dying loved one? If my grandmother was in pain and dying, it's easier for me to place "Assisted Suicide" on helping her rest versus saying that she was murdered. The point is that if the law books don't recognize it, then it's illegal and it's murder. On top of that, we've a man that no doubt has compassion for people – but made his life means out of taking other people's lives. How is this any different than a gunman that searches out and polls people down a street until s/he finds another with depression or mental illness and asks them "Are you suffering? Can I kill you so that you won't suffer?" If they say yes – is it murder for the gunman? Society would think so.

    June 15, 2010 at 08:17 | Report abuse | Reply
  6. Robb

    I am really torn on this subject. I think someone could look at his behavior as murder but on the other had what would you call hospice?

    When my grandfather was in hospice they nurses told my mother to give him less food and water each time he asked for it so his body would slowly shut down.

    Is my mother a murderer? Better yet are the trained professionals simply telling you to do these procedures so they can keep as much money in their pockets as possible.

    Is the Dr. any different, except for his methods, of helping people pass?

    June 15, 2010 at 15:54 | Report abuse | Reply
  7. odessa

    Someone who truly believes they were right would have no regrets. That is simple logic.

    June 15, 2010 at 21:22 | Report abuse | Reply
  8. davina

    a man among men , a humble hero who never asked for anything from anyone, unless you are walking in the shoes of a person who has had the horrible time of watching a loved one dying than do not judge this man!!!!!

    June 15, 2010 at 22:43 | Report abuse | Reply
  9. kevin hillman

    This Doctor(?) purports to be an athiest, and from my observation appears to have a cavalier disregard for the ethics that the US was founded upon. He presents as a person who is so self absorbed that he has no clue as to the impact of his behavior. He, as well as any other person, has no right to take any other persons life. Just because he has no faith in anything, does not give him the right to hang a shingle saying "Dr. Death is at your service".
    History will show that society can't tolerate this sort of singular minded behavior that conflicts with the precepts of society and the ethics that are built into the Consitution of the United States.
    It is no wonder why other Countries take umbrage with the US society when we let this type of individual play his life and death game in the media. I would suggest that he has had no semblance of any recognition in the mainstream medical community, thus he has fabricated his own.

    I am sickened!

    June 19, 2010 at 05:51 | Report abuse | Reply
  10. John

    Anyone who has gone through the hospice part of a nursing home watching a loved one die would be ignorant to not know that doses of drugs help a person get to the end without pain. After 2 death sentences by doctors, I had to watch my paralysized soul mate die for 5 mos in a nursing home and hospital.

    June 20, 2010 at 21:16 | Report abuse | Reply
  11. SKB

    I would be very careful about consulting the medical profession in matters concerning one's own death. There's a difference between "watching" people die and actually dying.

    You get one life. It's yours. Not theirs.

    June 21, 2010 at 00:18 | Report abuse | Reply
  12. Janet

    Dr. Gupta, I know that you must listen to both sides of this issue. But, please let me inform you. I am very old. I have been in stages of pain, when I wished I would just die. But, I did not. In time, I did get better. And then I was so glad that I was alive. The desire to live is basically much stronger than the desire to die to get rid of the pain. Aside from that, no other person, especially a doctor, should make a decision to help someone commit suicide. It is against our laws and our morals.Too much Morphine is being used by too many medical people. Decisions that are so serious should not be made by Doctors. Dr. Gupta, I hope you are not persuaded by this man.

    June 23, 2010 at 19:03 | Report abuse | Reply

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Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.