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February 9th, 2010
11:55 AM ET

Survivor buried 4 weeks?

Dr. Sanjay Gupta has returned to Haiti on assignment. In this piece, he reports on a quake survivor who may have been trapped in debris for four weeks.


soundoff (6 Responses)
  1. Debbie

    Four weeks. I sit here trying to wrap my brain around what type of mental hell that man went through for that length of time. What occupied his thoughts? What was the process of dealing with his plight? How did he face life and death each day? It's one thing to be in solitary confinement in a prison environment, but when you can't move? No food? No one to check on you? Not knowing if the ordeal will come to a fateful or successful end? Feeling like the world stopped. The frustration of no one being able to hear you. I can't fathom any of it. God love this poor man. I pray for his recovery both mental and physical.

    February 9, 2010 at 12:56 | Report abuse | Reply
  2. Sherri

    I am shocked and thankful that this man was found. He must have had a very strong will to live. I am sure I could not do what he did. I hope he is able to regain his health and that he has some family to care about/for him.

    February 9, 2010 at 15:01 | Report abuse | Reply
  3. Roosevelt Desronvilles

    Dr G.

    I applaud you and Anderson for such great reporting on Haiti. What people may not know, you recently produced a documentary on the Haitian modern day slavery known as Restavek. While I was a little bit disappointed with the documentary for a lack of emphasis on the different turns the life of a restavek can take when placed in different social circles, you certainly raised the issue to the consciousness of the world outside of Haiti. From there, I knew that you had to develop an affinity for the Haitian people.

    In this land of contrasts, we saw humanity at its best. As you stood at the epicenter of the earthquake that ravaged Port-au-Prince and surroundings to report to us, you were really standing at the epicenter of what humanity can be and do when we let us be guided by something greater than ourselves. This is really one of those moments in history where the hero is separated from the villain.

    Your reporting has brought home the urgent nature of the Healthcare system in Haiti. When I saw what Anderson famously labeled "stupid deaths" that could have been easily prevented, I was convinced if I could do anything, it needed to be in that area. When a company asked one of my cousins who lost his sister and nephew how it could help, we knew instantly what to say. The company ended up donating a ShelterPak to the Faith-based organization called JEBCA D'HAITI that's been so dear to us when were growing up in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. JEBCA expects to set up a mobile health clinic in Carrefour, Port-au-Prince to assist with the ongoing healthcare challenge. We're working on setting up three more centers to prevent stupid deaths. Again, it's all because your reporting inspired us, and thank you.

    I pray that God will help your family to endure with grace your noticeable and heartfelt absence.

    Peace and love!

    Roosevelt

    February 9, 2010 at 16:51 | Report abuse | Reply
  4. Clydia Jackson, RN

    Dr. Gupta,
    I am sure that you are aware of the 're-feeding syndrome' since you have visited scenes of many disasters and areas where people are going hungry, but I felt an urge to mention it. (Re-feeding syndrome). The man pulled out of flea market rubble after 27 days will experience this syndrome. When he begins to eat again, he will be at great risk for systemic inbalances. The first indicator that this syndrome is taking place is a decreased phosphate level. His O2 sats will be high and he will be producing more CO2. His body will be switching from glucogenesis (creating glucose from fat in the body) to glycogenesis (creating glucose from carbs and protein). This switch is a 'shock' to his system and can/will? cause an imbalance in homeostasis that can be life-threatening.
    PLEASE counsel his caregivers regarding this syndrome; but again, these great caregivers are most likely educated about this syndrome.

    Kind regards,
    C. Jackson

    February 10, 2010 at 06:21 | Report abuse | Reply
  5. Jackie

    This poor man will to live along with a very strong faith in God is the reason to live. I can't imagine not being able to have water. Please keep us posted on his recovery...we will pray his is ale to regain his strength.
    How old was this man?

    February 10, 2010 at 06:38 | Report abuse | Reply
  6. Eunice Beckford

    Pleaaaaaaaaaaasssssssssssssssssssssssssssee! keep the world imformed on how this gentleman is doing. I literally screeeeeemmmmed with joy when I heard the news. There was not enough room on my body to contain the "goose bumps"!!!! 🙂 My God is an awesome God!

    We continue to pray for his daily strength and recovery to get through this, and I'm looking forward to his testimony on Larry King.

    February 10, 2010 at 14:03 | Report abuse | Reply

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About this blog

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the latest stories from CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen and the CNN Medical Unit producers. They'll share news and views on health and medical trends - info that will help you take better care of yourself and the people you love.